Singapore fester

Contrary to the popular cliché, time does not heal all wounds; it makes them fester. The war, as Rana Mitter says, will continue being fought in Asia for many years to come. SINGAPORE — The man, who was in his 70s, had complained of pain. His family members realised something was wrong only when they started detecting an overpowering stench. 0673A Uncle Fester Lightbulb in Mouth Addams Family Funny ~ Mrs Butler Unique Switchplate Cover ~ Use Drop Down Box ~ See 0673B Background mrsbutlershop. From shop mrsbutlershop. 5 out of 5 stars (2,098) 2,098 reviews $ 14.00. Favorite Add to ... Uncle FESTER's cyanide and COUSIN Itt's hair tonic potion poison bottle props ADDAMS family PoisonAppleFlair. From shop PoisonAppleFlair. 5 out of 5 stars (778) 778 reviews $ 21.50. Favorite Add to Uncle Fester 5x7 DougThings. From shop DougThings. 5 out of 5 stars (297) 297 reviews $ ... Fester’s bloom could still be seen as of Monday morning, but zoo officials warned it “may be nearing the end” of the event. Matt Berg can be reached at [email protected] Follow him on ... A coronavirus outbreak among Singapore’s migrant workers helps explain, in an unexpected way, the country’s low Covid-19 fatality rate. ... allowing the virus to fester before public health ... Read more: Singapore stocks to watch Wednesday: ThaiBev, CapitaLand, Swiber, Hi-P, Singapore Exchange. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index lost 0.72 percent to 24,422.551 by Tuesday’s close, while China’s CSI 300 was down 0.18 percent at 3224.212. Singapore Writers Festival is one of the few multilingual literary festivals in the world, celebrating the written and spoken word in Singapore’s four official languages – English, Malay, Chinese and Tamil. The 2016 Singapore Writers Festival delves into the multi-faceted human condition with the theme, Sayang. A Malay word with multiple layers of meaning, it is used as a term of ... Mr Lee Hsien Yang did not run as a PSP candidate, asserting that “Singapore does not need another Lee”. Within the PAP leadership, policy differences and political orientations continue to fester.

Reflections on free-ridership and hopes for Singapore

2020.09.07 06:40 windiven Reflections on free-ridership and hopes for Singapore

I just need to say something about the free-rider issue that PM Lee said that has been festering inside me for a while.
The 'free-riding' thing is about the services/benefits/order that the PAP government brings about. You can vote for the opposition and still enjoy all the benefits that a PAP government brings. But that is not the point of PM Lee's statement, he was talking about people who voted for the opposition and yet fully wanted the PAP to form the government for various reasons (want PAP to 'work harder for them', etc), and how that kind of mindset isn't sustainable - people cannot vote for the opposition and expect PAP to form government in the long run. However, whether that is a good thing or a bad thing, how people should vote, is not the point of this post either. I just wanted to make a clarification for all those who only knew that PM made a 'free-rider' comment.
I find the state of politics worrying, with how divided people have become, and how strongly some people associate themselves with either side of the political spectrum. It is toxic for society to have people hating on/seeing the worst in whatever the opposing party does, just because you identify with one party. Jamus Lim (as much as I like and support his presence in parliament) isn't a hero fighting against tyranny; there is no villain to begin with. It was never a question of 'should we help ___?', but 'how do we help ___?'. PAP believes that PWM is the best way to help, and WP believes that minimum wage is the best way, and there are tradeoffs for each policy. We don't know what would be best, but it is a great and healthy discussion to have. What is not healthy are those who paint the opposition as the heroic underdog fighting to free those who are suffering from tyrants, and once the tyrants are removed all our problems will be solved. They will not be solved, and that is purely toxic. Like what Tharman has said, 'nobody has a monopoly on compassion'.
I think I just find it unjust that PAP is receiving all this negativity. Sure, there are always ways to do better, always more ways to help, but by no measure have they done a bad job, and they deserve my gratitude for all that they have done so far. Due credit must also be given to WP for fulfilling their role as opposition to questioning/challenging PAP on their policies. But we must remember that this isn't about our favorite celebrity or soccer team winning or scoring points, this is about Singapore. When politics becomes about our favorite person winning and not about the underlying validity and soundness of what they say, everybody loses.
submitted by windiven to singapore [link] [comments]


2020.06.10 05:46 assousa Confronting a Pandemic of Crises, Few Middle Eastern Leaders Step Up

by James M. Dorsey This story was first published in Inside Arabia A podcast version of this story is available on Soundcloud, Itunes, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spreaker, Pocket Casts, Tumblr, Podbean, Audecibel, Patreon and Castbox. A second wave of the coronavirus pandemic is raising its ugly head. It is putting Middle Eastern leaders at a crossroads as they struggle to contain the disease and tackle its economic fallout. The question is whether they are getting the message: neither containing and controlling the virus nor economic recovery is a straight shot. Both are likely to involve a process of two steps forward, one step backwards, and no state can successfully tackle the multiples crises on its own. The Middle East is a part of the world in which conflicts and problems are not just complex but inherently inter-connected. The pandemic poses not only political, economic, and social challenges. It also calls into question regional security arrangements that reinforce fault lines rather than create an environment that allows rivals to collectively manage disputes as well as diseases whose spread is not halted by physical and other boundaries. At stake is not just regional but also global security. Focused on their own healthcare and economic crises, Western nations ignore Middle Eastern and North African instability at their peril. They risk waking up to threats that could have been anticipated. Suspected Russian hopes that an end to the Libyan war would allow for the creation of a Russian military base on the southern shore of the Mediterranean that would complement facilities in Syria would be one such impending threat. “Russia wants a foothold in Libya, and that’s a fact,” said Pavel Felgenhauer, a Russian military analyist at the Jamestown Foundation. US officials warned that a permanent Russian presence would enhance Russia’s efforts to weaken the already strained trans-Atlantic alliance. The prospect of increased Russian influence in the Mediterranean coupled with China’s expanding sway over ports in the Eastern Mediterranean raises the specter of emboldening Turkey as it aggressively seeks to grow its control of energy-rich waters in the region in violation of international law. “To avoid the worst outcomes for an already fraught region, there is no substitute and frankly no alternative to some form of cooperation among regional actors. . . . With the Middle East likely to emerge from the COVID-19 crisis more fragile and potentially explosive than before, a cooperative architecture that can build regional resilience is an imperative,” said strategist Steven Kenney and international relations scholar Ross Harrison in a just released Washington-based Middle East Institute report. The economic part of the message is already evident: Putting an end to the pandemic and economic recovery will be a painful and long-drawn-out process. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Iran, Lebanon, and Israel are witnessing first signs of the pandemic’s second wave. Increasing the likelihood of a cancellation of this year’s Muslim pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca scheduled for late July, Saudi Arabia re-imposed a lockdown in the Red Sea port of Jeddah, the haj’s major gateway, after a spike in coronavirus infections. The lockdown involves a two-week, 15-hour curfew from 15:00 p.m. to 06:00 a.m. A dramatic surge in infections in Iran, averaging 3,000 new cases a day, has rekindled the Middle East’s largest outbreak, weeks after the country appeared to have tamed the virus. Israel closed dozens of schools and ordered any school reporting a virus case to shut down following a surge in coronavirus cases that swept through classrooms two weeks after they were allowed to reopen. Mass social and economic protests in Lebanon, a country on the brink of financial collapse, have heightened the risk of a second wave of the pandemic. The surge bodes ill for economic recovery. Based on a survey of 1,228 CEOs, the Dubai Chamber of Commerce warned that a staggering 70 percent of businesses in the emirate expect to close their doors within the next six months. The warning came as the UAE government extended a nightly curfew following a doubling of infections after it eased lockdown restrictions. Government-backed UAE carriers Emirates and Etihad Airways have since extended reduced pay for staff until September as they try to preserve cash. Austerity measures threaten to bring the social unrest that has swept the Middle East and North Africa for the past decade closer to the Gulf. “If it’s temporary, one or two years, I can adapt. My concern is that more taxes will be permanent — and that will be an issue,” said Mohammed, a Saudi government worker after his $266 USD a month cost of living allowance was cancelled and sales taxes were tripled as part of painful austerity measures announced by Finance Minister Mohammed Al-Jadaan. Mr. Mohammed’s words were echoed in a rare pushback against the government by columnist Khalid Al-Sulaiman, writing in the Okaz daily, one of the kingdom’s tightly controlled media outlets. “I was hoping [the minister] would say [the tax hike] would be reviewed after the coronavirus crisis is gone or contained, or when oil prices improve, but he did not say that. Citizens are feeling concerned that pressure on their living standards will last longer than the current crisis,” Mr. Al-Sulaiman said. The challenges Gulf states face of an ongoing healthcare crisis and a painful, protracted, and complex road toward economic recovery, coupled with debilitating regional conflicts that not only fester but appear to be expanding, are almost insurmountable obstacles. Kuwaiti efforts to resolve the rift in the Gulf and pressure by US President Donald J. Trump on Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain to lift their three-year-old air embargo of Qatar have raised, perhaps prematurely, the hope of an end to the conflict. Although there is no public indication that the parties are willing to seriously engage. The proxy war in Libya, in which the UAE-backed forces of rebel commander Khalifa Haftar are on the defensive, is extending into the Eastern Mediterranean as Turkey claims rights in energy-rich territorial waters in violation of international law. Meanwhile, Abu Dhabi-based English language newspaper The National, despite UAE efforts to reduce tension with Iran, seemed, to stop just short of inviting Israel to attack an Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps’ command and control center on the outskirts of the main airport of Damascus, the capital of Syria. “For now, the Glass House remains unshattered,” The National said in a detailed expose of the center dubbed The Glass House. Middle Eastern leaders are confronting the worst pandemic of crises since independence. Addressing those predicaments requires regional and global leadership which looks beyond immediate survival and ideological and geopolitical rivalries; a leadership which recognizes that stability and solutions to shared threats must be vested in longer term managing and cooperation in tackling common challenges rather than maintaining conflict. The problem is that few leaders seem willing or able to step up to the plate. Dr. James M. Dorsey is an award-winning journalist and a senior fellow at Nanyang Technological University’s S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies in Singapore. He is also an adjunct senior research fellow at the National University of Singapore’s Middle East Institute and co-director of the University of Wuerzburg’s Institute of Fan Culture in Germany
submitted by assousa to MiddleEast [link] [comments]


2020.06.08 11:39 lengpew Please don't let FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt) prevent us from progressing forward

edit: please tell me why I'm wrong or how I'm an idiot. I don't mind the downvotes, but I hope to hear from people about it even if they disagree, the downvotes just buries the post.
First, we can all agree that these are trying times. There is cause for frustration, even anger, with everything going on right now. I'm fearful for the physical and mental health of my friends and relatives. I'm worried about the economy. I don't feel like the "normal" we have been used to will ever return, in the same way 911 fundamentally changed air travel. I'll also share that despite my tone, the past few months have greatly affected my health in negative ways.
One of the things I'm most proud of is the overall pragmatism of our people and our government (in that order). The world is constantly going mad, but here the voice, let alone the power of extreme ideologies are not provided space to grow. We don't have armed white (or if you want, Chinese-race) militias who get to openly bare fangs and provide a climate of fear. We also don't allow unfounded fears to drive our policies (I'm thinking of "death squads" regarding Obama's healthcare policies), and that "alternative facts" or the real kind of "fake news" aren't allowed to fester our airways.
This positive feeling about our fellow citizens is being challenged around recent discussions about a potential mandatory, physical device for contact tracing. Instead of voices echoing pragmatic, logical reasoning mixed in with an understanding of our cultural sensitivities, I feel like I'm reading a lot of fear-driven reactions that prohibit positive progress we could be making. I also don't think I'm alone.
I realize I'm immediately likely to offend people here, but my first reaction is that many of these conversations sound like... arguments from the anti-vax community about why they don't believe vaccinations should be mandatory, and as a result, follow their misguided beliefs, sometimes to devastating consequences. I'm extremely glad this isn't a concern here when in many parts of North America vaccinations can fall below thresholds of effectiveness.
You can yell at me and tell me I'm wrong. I'm open to that. Below, I'll touch on the notions I've read from various people here, and suggest why I don't believe these concerns should scare you. It's too early to suggest that you should adopt such a device if it should come - like many of you suggest, we need more details - but I do feel that the antagonistic stand many are already taking has the very real possibility of preventing us from making progress towards a sustained return to a new normal.
"This crosses the line because it truly invades our privacy"
I'm making a key assumption here: that such a device would effectively mirror the permissions and functionality of the TraceTogether app. It's the closest real-world analogue of what the government has put out for contact tracing purporses, I think it's fair to use that as a benchmark since it shows a consideration over the concerns in privacy and tracking.
Maybe it's me coming in from a tech background, but realistically, our privacy is mostly dead. Our phones track us to such a precise degree that if someone wanted to find us, with cell tower triangulation we'd be found within a short distance. You use wifi? That's even more specific, down to the dozens of meters from the router you get your internet from.
What websites do you go to? Our ISPs have access to that information too. Oh, but I use a VPN. Well, maybe you do, but the vast majority of Singaporeans don't. And there's no guarantee that it's completely shielding you away from being found (IPV6 leaks). Also, the 20TB of traffic passed to your ISP over the past month you're pushing? Doesn't look suspicious at all. And that's all if your VPN suggests they don't log, even if they do.
Between physical-location tracking and the sites you go to (destination), I'm convinced that if the government wants to, it can figure it out for the vast majority of Singaporeans. It's not a Singapore-government thing too. The same thing is likely to happen in other countries. What might be different is the speed in which access to such data is facilitated.
The TraceTogether app (and potentially this physical device) is open sourced, vetted by experts (I think a close analogue are doctors and physicians as it relates to understanding vaccinations), and found not to provide location information. Its only goal is to allow the government to trace transmissions, to prevent further transmissions and to help those who have potentially gotten the virus. How is that bad? And if the new device is similar, what is the problem, especially if it doesn't actually track your locations?
"Just because we're tracked more than this device would doesn't mean we should cede further ground on our privacy."
First, I'm not sure how many people realize they are already being tracked much more than they think, even outside of existing companies like Google or Apple. Second, as it relates to tracking I don't consider this any more than a drop in the bucket. It has a time-limited use for a very specific purpose, and does not transmit your location. Considering the utility, I see this as a positive.
"It's a slippery slope: the government can take this exercise, make it mandatory and choose to enforce further systems like this in place"
Three thoughts here. For one, all eyes are on the policy makers from both Singaporeans and the global community worldwide. There's tremendous pressure to get this right not only because of its ability to save lives and the economy, but anyone associated with the program will get the blame if anything goes wrong. Part of this includes making sure that privacy is greatly considered, another is that any overreach down the road will be examined greatly by both detractors and supporters alike. The risks of putting up a complicated, mandatory system in place are high. The risks of being blamed if anything goes wrong is higher. If the people associated with this are willing to put up the risk, they know they suffer the consequences. Why not give them a chance?
On top of that, we already have far-reaching, mandatory systems in place. NS. NRIC. CPF. There are concerns and criticisms over their implementation, but on balance I'd suggest that most people understand their purposes and have been okay with trading in some freedoms to fulfill the objectives they were created to serve. It feels strange that it has to be this one that people feel is an overreach before details are passed out, especially if the purpose is clear and likely time-limited. If you don't think it'll be time-limited that's fine, but I can tell you if that's what happens I'll be right beside you pressuring politicians to drop it.
Finally, let's say that the program is somewhat successful. It's on par with where things are today: many people are frustrated, but understand the good intentions and good has been done. There's potential considerations for a different program that's either mandatory or pretty much close to it, with similarities on this one, but for another cause. Why immediately block the possibility of it happening, or antagonizing the process so much so early on? If we've found that our civil servants have done a good job, why sabotage such potential programs? Have they not earned some trust to implement further systems meant to help all of us?
"The government hasn't handled the situation well, how can we trust them to do this correctly?"
There's a balance here. Things haven't been perfect, but I believe good things are being done, certainly as they relate to how many other countries have been reacting. I continue to trust that our civil servants and politicians are doing what they think is best, and mistakes in this unprecedented circumstances are understandable. In short, I don't think the disagreement of how some of the execution has occurred should wipe out the trust people have in what we've collectively achieved so far.
"Third parties could do something malicious with these devices"
I'll make this short and say that it's likely that I don't have the imagination to see what extremely nefarious things can be achieved with this, given that the core information belongs and is withheld by the government. Also, I would suggest that anyone with a minimal interest not to have their lives completely ruined would be fearful of attempting to co-opt a governmental system explicitly meant to help with the pandemic. I can believe that the dire consequences of utilizing what's there beyond its given purpose would be made extremely clear.
"It's better to sound the bells early, just to make sure any potential overreach doesn't happen."
I agree with that, but I don't think I'm hearing a reasonable "sounding of the bells". It's closer to "poisoning the well" before a possibile implementation even comes to the table. Most of us agree there isn't enough information yet. Yet many are already condeming this as the one step too far that they would even leave the country because of it. I'm hearing extreme positions being taken, not a more measured dialogue of concern.
"Why doesn't the government use the Apple API now that it's been released, like Google's?"
Trying to develop native applications for both platforms is a pain. New APIs where things might, or might not work...? I realize this might sound like too far flung, but as a developer, new things like this give me pause. It takes time to get them right, even if the smartest people in the smartest companies are trying to release them, especially when it's done in a rush. It would not surprise me to see further updates in the coming weeks over this, and depending your security and effectivess on these systems would worry me.
Beyond that, while this might seem ridiculous, not everyone has a phone or uses it all the time. Think of the elderly (and yes I know many have easily adopted newer technologies, but I'm sure you agree it's not all of them). What about kids? I was talking to my wife about this, and I agree with her in preferring a specific, wearable device created for a very specific purpose that you can drop when its use is no longer required.
"Leaks by the government around our personal information don't give me confidence that this won't happen with this approach"
That may happen, but no more than much more sensitive information that the government or many MNCs already have on us. This really shouldn't be the straw that manages to break the camel's back.
"Oh, it's too bad that my device... might get lost... suffer a fall... be somehow struck by lightning..."
I get disagreeing with policy, but this is just... A device like this, or many of the policies put in place, are meant to help us all collectively. It sounds to me like someone in the U.S. declining vaccinations "because of religious reasons" when it is a cover for just disagreeing with the policy. It sounds like the people choosing to meet in public despite CB, because F U I disagree and I got mine.
"You don't know any better, you're just speculating too."
You're right. But I'm also not actively sharing unfounded fears in a way that can prevent a possible, viable solution from being considered, let alone brought to the table for discussion.
What if this is the way forward? When Singapore was seen as the hallmark of what could and should be done earlier in the year, much of it was around the efforts in and around contact tracing that's still heralded, despite where we currently stand on infections, by countries around the world. It was effective and a good thing to be proud of. Did you not feel pride in being in a country that such a program is actively, even today, being emulated?
And yes, things have changed. If infections were still low, we would still be living life as we did earlier in the year. The infections seemed under control through contact tracing and we held out longer than most countries in the world in having to go through some form of a CB. It has and continues to benefit us, and the fact that we have so many Singaporeans and foreigners going in and out of the country shouldn't suprise us if infections stemming from other nations ultimately affects us.
If this is the next step: a (to me) minimally invasive contact tracer that ensures closer to 100% adoption for a nation of people, and allows us to open up, live life as usual, but allow the medical profession to keep people safe and prevent further spreads of the disease, then I'm for it. It would make me feel safer, and know that if I or any of my friends/family might've possibly been infected, that we get any necessary help or support right away.
But it might not happen or be possible if our echo chambers are filled with fear reinforced with more fear. I started by suggesting that I'm proud of our fellow countryfolk for generally being pragmatic. Being human, we are swayed by emotion, but here we ultimately decide with logic, reasoning and science. Let us use this lens to objectively look at what may come, listen to the experts (tech or otherwise) about the invasiveness of such a device as more details come to us, and then let our civil servants know our concerns that are based on facts and information.
Thanks for reading so far, it took a while to write, but I felt it was important to bring this up. I don't mean to anger anyone, I'll gladly hear why I'm wrong about this.
submitted by lengpew to singapore [link] [comments]


2020.03.14 21:33 LettuceGoat [CONFLICT] Our Final Act

"As the age of empires comes to an end, we as the British must recognize our current place in the world; we must make our final acts across the empire to leave a new world of stable governments & ever-lasting peace."

December 17th, London

Malaysian independence has been slated for June 1st, however, recent news from the territory might force the British to rethink their strategy for peace in the east. The MCP’s continual terrorist attacks on the Malaysian people, and their sympathies with the tyrannical Communist thought spells a bad future for the country if they are left to fester. So, while Gaitskell is still prepared for eventual Malaysian independence, he was found it crucial to send in a Commonwealth force to subdue the rebels & ensure a future of peace & democracy in Malaysia.
The current Malaysian government, working under supervision of the British, under the lead of Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman, is expected to carry the bulk of the war effort, whilst being supported by arms & soldiers from the rest of the Commonwealth. Britain has prepared a free aid package of weapons & vehicles for the Malaysian state, as well as a cadre of some 4,000 military advisors & trainers to aid the Malaysian government. The aid package will go as follows;
  • 375,000 assorted British small arms; this would include bolt-action, semi, and automatic rifles, as well as adequate ammunition to expand on them. The United Kingdom advises the Malaysians to use these guns to equip & expand the Malayan Home Guard’s to 200,000 active members. This number will also be backed up by minimal amounts of light explosives, such as mortars, grenades, as well as some heavy machine guns + tripods.
  • 2,500 artillery pieces & shells; these are to be used to back up the Commonwealth & proper Malaysian regiments.
  • 500 planes, ammunition & shells to use; this will mostly be bomber planes, used for flushing out & destroying insurgent camps. Malaysian pilots will be trained for the proper amount of time, whilst the Commonwealth air force holds the skies in their lieu. No incendiary arms will be used.
  • 2,700 trucks; for transport through the jungles of Malay.
  • Assorted clothes, helmets, bags, food supplies, shoes, etc. - general equipment for Malaysian police, constables, & infantry to use. Camouflaged, tailored for use in jungles & rivers.
  • Pamphlets; to be distributed amongst the Malaysian population, warning against communism & joining the insurgents.
With this aid package, titled “Operation BAM (British Arms in Malaysia),” Hugh Gaitskell hopes that the Malaysians will be able to set up a powerful army to crush the rebellion. However, in the meantime, he will approve the use of a British-Commonwealth force to maintain peace whilst Malaysia prepares. He has also heavily advised the Malaysians to have a very strict & tight recruitment system, in order to stop any members of the MCP from infiltrating the army like how the Viet Minh did to the Indochinese Army in Indochina.
Hugh Gaitskell will also require several reforms of the Malaysian government in order to break the rebellion’s support; most of which is coming from the ethnic Chinese population. Malaysia will need to support its Chinese population, firstly in granting them the same rights to vote & rights to land that the ethnic Malay have; the primary reason for their rebellion. Britain itself is also willing to pay for such reforms, as well as investment into the rural, ethnically Chinese areas, in order to bring them up to par with the rest of Malaysia’s development. In order to maintain the support of the other ethnicities, (only somewhat racist) pamphlets will be distributed by planes & Malaysian police forces, as well as various other informational channels being created to warn against the genocidal & tyrannical dangers of communism.
Sir Robert Grainger Ker Thompson, a master in counterinsurgent warfare, will be placed in charge of both military & civilian operations. The current British plan will revolve around maintaining civilian support & pushing the communists further into the desolate inner jungle. Large stores of medical supplies, aid, medics, food, and home appliances will be brought to supply native villages & cities, and British small-scale loans will be used to revitalize the lives of the native people; to be put in stark contrast with the native’s continual terrorist attacks on both British & Malaysian peoples. Interrogations are to be light, and captured insurgents & sympathizers will be placed into well-maintained prisons, and never executed. Arrests & guarding will be undertaken by national Malaysian, not British, personnel whenever possible. Any interrogations will revolve around finding the locations of insurgents bases, secret paths they take, or routes their patrols go on, and amnesty will be offered if the information is found to be true or particularly valuable. In propaganda, this will be used as a stark contrast of the MCP’s tactics of brutal torture & extortion from villages under their control.
Large, sweeping movements are to be abandoned, for instead smaller patrols that will go in. These patrols will be equipped with large amounts of food, as well as cash, in order to ensure they have proper food supplies for their extended stays in the jungle. The jungle will be filled by British-Malaysian controls, pushing the MCP further & further into more desolate parts of the jungle, forcing them to use even more brutal tactics to attain food & supplies to fuel their effort, further dropping their native support. When an insurgent camp is found, it will be surrounded, before being hit by preliminary aerial bombs & mortar strikes which will clear the way for an ambush by British-Malaysian forces; firepower from the air & ground alone should ensure quick victories whenever they are discovered.
Cities will have their police forces see a huge increase in funds backed up by the British & Malaysian governments, and they will begin to be trained in finding any potential insurgents & sympathizers living in them. Congregations of those listening to Marxist teachings will be broken up, with the main leaders arrested. House raids will be conducted against those found to be aiding the Communists, however, they will only be arrested. Fortifications, bunkers, and gun turrets will be set up around the perimeter of cities, in case the Communists try some desperate attack against them. From the port of Singapore, small naval patrols will be undertaken by the 5th Cruiser Squadron & 8th Destroyer Squadron, ensuring no foreign arms are being shipped in from Vietnam or Soviet Russia.
While the actual Malaysian army is in the process of massive expansion, the current Malaysian army will be backed up by troops from both Britain & the Commonwealth. The United Kingdom is hoping for a total force of 40,000 anti-insurgents, of which it will contribute some 15,000 soldiers, drafted from the United Kingdom proper, with 5,000 that will come for our remaining colonies in Africa & the Caribbean; Kenya will be exempted from this draft, as they have some of their own Mau Mau troubles to deal with. As for the remaining 20,000, we call upon our former colonies & current dominions to aid their brothers in the Commonwealth. In particular, Australia, New Zealand, & Fiji, are all very close to the conflict itself, and South Africa does have previous experience in putting down guerilla uprisings. Pakistan & India are also close, however currently embroiled in their own conflicts (with each other :P), so we may need to rely on Nepal for the famously skilled Ghurka troops. Ghana, Bechuanaland, & South Rhodesia are all currently dominions and are also asked to attend. Tanzania has already contributed to part of the 5,000-strong British African regiment, however, the Sultan is invited to send more soldiers if he sees fit. Kenya has its own Mau Mau problems to deal with. Canada is also asked, although we don’t expect them to send anybody. Any arms shipments to the Malaysians are also accepted. Egypt is asked, but given their current situation in Palestine, we don't expect anything of them. Any units which are sent will be subservient to British control & orders and will serve alongside British patrols & garrisons.
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2020.02.26 15:32 abaraxus Coronavirus alias COVID-19 Analysis of Death rates and more. No Trolls, Please

Darwanism Survival of the fittest defined by JP:

"The organism adapts traits in order to survive in the environment that it is in, that are advantageous to the organism in relation to the environment."

Coronavirus, alias COV-19 Diamond Princess quarantine Main points: Quarantine procedures Coronavirus identification Symptoms Testing Treatments Medical care Personal experiences Supply chains Global threat Sinister plot
Conclusion
Updates:
Lab experiment leaked?
A. Watch "Chinese scientists says COVID-19/coronavirus could have originated from government ..." on YouTube
B. The plot thickens:
B1 Religious Death Cult? One woman infects hundreds
B2 Singapore woman infected with both coronavirus and Dengue fever
C. ADE - antibody dependent enhancement.

The following is an off the cuff analysis of death rate and infections as they pertain to China, Diamond Princess, Japan and The World.

JH

  1. Death rate calculations
  2. Projected Total Deaths in China by 22 Feb 2020
  3. Projected total death from Diamond Princess case study
  4. China COVID-19 (coronavirus) momentum analysis
  5. Japan Momentum Analysis
  6. Global projected death toll based on calculated Death Rate
  7. Japan cities with cases of Coronavirus:
  8. Cruise ships
  9. Suggestions to protect yourself and stop spreading the virus
  10. Eyes of Darkness, Dean R. Koontz, pseudonym Leigh Nichols
  11. Additional sources used:

Coronavirus alias COVID-19 ‐---------------------------
This is a rapidly evolving epidemic and the passengers on the Diamond Princess are no worse off than those locked down in quarantine in other countries. You really think even the United States is letting its returnees just roam freely? Not a chance, that's why they are all locked down on military bases and guarded by people who know how to follow orders to the letter if the situation warrants. It is the first time since 1918 the U.S. has had a full blown quarantine, but I think armed soldiers still have their orders to use lethal force if necessary. Trust me, it has happened before.
The Diamond Princess should have been fumigated and its ventilation system cleaned and devices placed in the intakes to prevent the virus from spreading. But these measures probably were not warranted in our early attempts to understand the coronavirus. When we are still trying, almost two months into the epidemic, to establish methods of transmission, life expectancy of the virus on objects, what disinfectants kill the virus, accurate tests for infection, an immunization, which is projected 18 months away, medical care for the infected, quarantine protocol-self quarantine? And a plethora of other things we have yet to realize as this epidemic spreads. Globally, we cannot even supply people with cheap cotton masks.
There were no test kits/methods at the beginning of the Diamond Princess quarantine or at least very limited. Even the U.S. has had faulty test kits. So I imagine this is why Japan did not initially test all the passengers and the standard worldwide is to test after the exhibition of symptoms by a person, NOT to indiscriminately test the whole population. There have been negative test results from patients who later tested positive. So testing is not foolproof.
I admitted myself into the VA hospital in Tampa, three years ago, while vacationing in Florida, because I had a rapid onset of fever, 104°, in less than 12 hours, with a headache that felt like my head was exploding. Two nasal swabs came back negative for influenza. After I insisted that something was wrong, because this was the fastest and worst illness I had ever had in 50 years. The doctor ran a swab up my nose on both sides into what felt like my brain. I eventually convinced them that I had something bad, so they admitted me into a general ward with at least eight other patients. The next day, 24 hours later, the test came back positive for influenza A. Needless to say my roommates weren't too happy and I got put in my own private room, where everyone came in wearing suits, gloves, eye shields and masks.
Even identifying those who are symptomatic is difficult since the symptoms described for identifying the coronvirus have been constantly evolving. And even the age groups susceptible to the virus has been evolving since the beginning. Not to mention the virus symptoms are the same as the common cold. These factors combine to make coronavirus detection very difficult. Even so, medical staff and hospitals are overwhelmed to treat/test everyone who presents the basic cold symptoms. Thus the call for people to SELF-ISOLATE.
When one of my shipmates in the U. S. Coast Guard came down with the chicken pox while on patrol in the Gulf of Gunave, near Cuba, he was removed from the ship and isolated at Guantanamo Naval Hospital. So removing the infected from the Diamond Princess seems to be the standard procedure. But with the lack of a definite virus contraction to symptom exhibition or even positive test timeline it makes sense to leave the rest of the passengers where they are and not move them and all their belongings to another quarantine facility for 14 plus days. Japan is not the only country preventing passengers exposed to this virus from disembarking and it probably will not be the last. Why did not the Diamond Princess leave Japan for other ports that may have been more receptive to the virus epidemic onboard?
As the virus epidemic has unfolded, the timeline from contraction to symptom exhibition has not been standardized, 14 days seems to be more of an estimated window with the U.S. clearing some evacuees after 12.5 days and North Korea mandating a 30 day quarantine period. One country is preventing the purchase of over the counter medications in hopes that people will go to the doctor.
Interestingly, around the 31st of January, I was speaking with my family about the process of making a serum from the antibodies of recovering patients. I'm no expert, but I have to wonder why it took so long for the medical community to come to this conclusion? It was announced around February 14th that China was now doing this and having some success with critical patients. Unfortunately, drug companies cannot synthesize a cure to market, at least not yet.
It is easy to look at a situation after the fact and armchair quarterback it, but when you are on the frontlines, catching flack from all sides, you do your best with the knowledge and tools at hand. I think Japan, being the first to encounter this situation, has done what is necessary due to the rapidly evolving coronavirus, COVID-19!
Conspiracy? It does seem odd that at least two countries that recently posed a retaliatory threat to the United States and have since been very quiet in terms of coronavirus cases nor to mention North Korea promised the U. S. a present and Iran, amid global fears of a third world war after the assassination of it's second in command, laid down very easily.
So, if one could fathom this line of thought, possibly read The Art of War, these threats seem more of a feint to distract the U. S. from the real retaliatory action.
If one could imagine, the master minds behind the curtain have planned the perfect attack:
A virus escape from a lab for the most dangerous viruses in the world, in a city of millions, a country and area known for such incidents. An international airport that normally has hundreds of thousands of flights around the world. The exodus of over five million people from the area shortly after the virus became known in China, not the rest of the world. The largest mass migration of people in the world for the Asian New New Year. The shuttering of New Years celebrations in China and elsewhere, forcing people to travel abroad for what is somewhat of a religious traditional activity to welcome the New Year.
Planes, trains, taxis, subways, trolleys, buses, cruise ships and other modes of mass transit combined with large gathering areas of highly mobile individuals disseminating out into other areas of large and small hinterland populations spread the coronavirus throughout the world allowing it to hide and fester creating successive outbreaks, like smouldering fires, around the globe. Additionally, the coronavirus is slowly becoming an epidemic in Japan, host of the 2020 Olympics. Stores like Daiso, pharmacies and many others cannot keep a supply of cheap paper face masks on their shelves and we were only one month into 2020. Japan's large cities, havens for tourism and locals, have a plethora of shopping arcades, food stands, restaurants, pachinko slots, video arcades, onsens, drink machines on every corner, a multitude of tourist attractions, public lavatories, transportation networks, and an aging population too boot. It's a perfect Pinky and The Brain plot to take over the world.
Who's to Benefit: I strongly suspect that this is either North Korea's forewarned gift or Iran's retaliation for the death of it's general. The labs in Wuhan have let the so called cat out of the bag before with SARS. Really, how hard would it be to infiltrate these labs and do it again? It has happened to lots of high security facilities around the world. This could put any nation at odds with the USA and nations friendly to it in the catbird seat. Odd looking at a world map and seeing North Korea not lit up when it is surrounded by coronavirus. The whole world seems to have gone to GQ over this in January before there were many deaths. It has a much more widespread effect than the death of the Iranian general and the impending threat of war. Something as simple as a flimsy mask is out of stock in stores almost the world around. The Stand's opening lines from T.S Eliott seem very prophetic at this time. "This is the way the word ends, not with a bang but a wimper."
One last point. Why in the [email protected]$l would you want to put a lab dealing with some of the most dangerous diseases/viruses in the world in a city with a population of millions? This should be done in a remote location, island, ship, undersea, Antarctic, artic, Sahara, or freaking outer space. Not where there's an international airport that transports millions around the globe. It's a perfect place for bioterrorism. They really should have relocated it after the first virus escaped years ago. I'm just saying, I ain't no rocket scientist, but...WTF.
How about this recent headline?
Ancient never-before-seen viruses discovered locked up in Tibetan glacier Who is playing with this?
Conclusion:
The coronavirus, COV-19, is a global problem that has incited fear in the human race and suspicion even among close cohorts and family groups. Medical, transportation and supply systems are struggling to cope. The general populace is having difficulty preventing contamination. One that all nations are struggling to come to grips with that will not soon be resolved nor easily stemmed. Compassion, understanding and information sharing is the only way we will defeat this threat that is projected to infect sixty percent of the world's population.
My apologies for wasting your time.
19 Feb Update:
Virus escaped from lab! We knew this already based on historical occurrences, SARS escaped from the lab in Wuhan in 2012, and the flurry of the Chinese government in the first days of the event. Where there is smoke, there is FIRE! Old cliches are rooted in wisdom. A. Watch "Chinese scientists says COVID-19/coronavirus could have originated from government ..." on YouTube https://youtu.be/ZC0gww2yznI
B. The plot thickens:
B1 South Korean Death Cult One woman infects hundreds Shadowy Church Is at Center of Coronavirus Outbreak in South Korea
As the country’s infection numbers soar, most cases have been connected to the Shincheonji Church of Jesus, which mainstream churches consider a cult.
SEOUL, South Korea — At meetings of the secretive Shincheonji Church of Jesus, worshipers sit packed together on the floor, forbidden to wear glasses — or face masks. They come to church even when sick, former members say. After services, they split up into groups for Bible study, or to go out into the streets and proselytize.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/21/world/asia/south-korea-coronavirus-shincheonji.amp.html#aoh=15825567212448&referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&_tf=From%20%251%24s
B2 Woman becomes first Singaporean to be diagnosed with both dengue and coronavirus https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/southeast-asia/article/3051712/woman-becomes-first-singaporean-be-diagnosed-both-dengue
In January, the NEA claimed that “Singapore has not seen a DenV-3 outbreak in the last three decades,
https://amp.scmp.com/news/asia/southeast-asia/article/3051712/woman-becomes-first-singaporean-be-diagnosed-both-dengue#aoh=15825597128956&referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com&_tf=From%20%251%24s
Coronavirus: Rare to have Covid-19 and dengue, say experts of Singapore's first patient with both, Health News & Top Stories - The Straits Times
Responding to news that Singapore has confirmed the first patient to test positive for both diseases, doctors The Straits Times spoke to said that it is a highly unusual case.
https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/rare-to-have-coronavirus-and-dengue
Wonder if any others outside of Singapore have been tested for Dengue? I suspect they have not been. Would give more support to lab experiment hypothesis as further indicated in C below.
C ADE - antibody dependent enhancement.
This happens because the person's antibodies attach to normal cells via a process called ADE. The virus can then attack the anti-bodies and gain entry into the cell at an expedited rate. It is what cause Denque Fever to later become Denque Hemorrhagic Fever.
Here is the abstract of the study. I don't have access to the full study.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1286457920300344?via%3Dihub
If this is the case, and it looks like it is, this explains the reported secondary infections of COVID19 in China being very deadly and explains why some people get very severe disease and some don't could be based on prior exposure to other coronavirus acquired from close contact with animals and raw animal carouses.
If true, it lends more credibility that this was an engineered virus, maybe even engineered to be a weapon.
Article: Is COVID-19 Receiving ADE From Other Coronaviruses?
Author links open overlay panelJason A.Tetro
Show more
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2020.02.006Get rights and content
Abstract
One of the most perplexing questions regarding the current COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic is the discrepancy between the severity of cases observed in the Hubei province of China and those occurring elsewhere in the world. One possible answer is antibody dependent enhancement (ADE) of SARS-CoV-2 due to prior exposure to other coronaviruses. ADE modulates the immune response and can elicit sustained inflammation, lymphopenia, and/or cytokine storm, one or all of which have been documented in severe cases and deaths. ADE also requires prior exposure to similar antigenic epitopes, presumably circulating in local viruses, making it a possible explanation for the observed geographic limitation of severe cases and deaths.
Keywords: COVID-19, coronavirus, antibody dependent enhancement, SARS, SARS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2, Hubei, China, PHEIC, WHO, outbreak, epidemic
Analysis
  1. Death rate calculations
  2. Projected Total Deaths in China by 22 Feb 2020 :
  3. Projected total death from Diamond Princess case study
  4. China COVID-19 (coronavirus) momentum analysis
  5. Japan Momentum Analysis
  6. Global projected death toll based on calculated Death Rate
  7. Japan cities with cases of Coronavirus:
  8. Cruise ships
  9. Suggestions to protect yourself and stop spreading the virus
  10. Eyes of Darkness, Dean R. Koontz, pseudonym Leigh Nichols
  11. Food for thought The Festivals behind the Biggest Human Migrations - Office Holidays Blog
https://blog.officeholidays.com/festivals/the-festivals-behind-the-biggest-human-migrations/
  1. Additional sources used:
‐---------‐-----------------
  1. Death rate calculations:
30 Jan 106TD (Total Deaths)÷4,515TC (Total Cases)=0.0234772979% DR (Death Rate or a rough mortality estimate)
132D÷5,794C = 0.0227821885%DR
31 Jan 213TD÷9,809TC = 0.0217147518%DR
1 Feb 238TD÷11,302TC= 0.0228278181%DR
2 Feb 304TD÷14,200TC= 0.0214084507%DR
305TD÷14,300TC = 0.0213286713%DR
3 Feb 361TD÷17,178TC= 0.0210152521%DR
4 Feb 362TD÷17,491TC = 0.0206963581%DR
6 Feb 494TD÷24,500TC = 0.0201632653%DR
8 Feb 722TD÷34,000TC = 0.0212352941%DR
724TD÷34,958TC = 0.020710567%DR
9 Feb 910TD÷40, 335TC= 0.0225610512%DR
811TD÷37,198TC= 0.0218022474%DR
11 Feb 910TD÷40,235TC= 0.0226171244%DR
1,013TD÷42,500TC = 0.0238352941%DR
1,016TD÷42,638TC= 0.0238285098
http://global.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202002/21/WS5e2a95d9a310128217273202.html
12 Feb 1,110TD÷44,515TC = 0.024935415%DR
12 Feb 97 deaths?
13 Feb 242D 1,352 TD÷48,206TC= 0.0280172414% DR
121D, 5,090NC 1,380TD÷63,851TC=0.0216107866DR
14 Feb 143D, 2,641NC 1,523TD÷66,492TC= 0.0229050111%DR
14 Feb 121D, 5,090NC, 1,380TD÷63,851= 0.0216128173%DR
15 Feb 143D, 2,641NC 1,523TD÷66,492TC= 0.0229050111%DR
16 Feb 142D, 2,009NC 1,665TD÷68,500TC= 0.0243065693%DR
17 Feb 2,048NC, 1,868D÷70,548C=0.026478426%DR
18 Feb 1,873TD÷73,000TC= 0.0256575342%DR
1868TD÷72436TC= 0.0257882821%DR
1,886NC, 72,436TC
19 Feb 136ND, 1,749NC 2,004TD÷74,185TC= 0.026959628%DR
20 Feb 136ND, 394NC 2,118TD÷74,546TC= 0.0284119872%DR
21 Feb 118D, 889NC 2,236TD÷75,468TC= 0.0296284518%DR
22 Feb 2,442TD÷76,936TC= 0.0317406676%DR
22 Feb 2,345TD÷76,288TC= 0.0307387794%DR
23 Feb 2,513TD÷77,249TC= 0.0325311655%DR
24 Feb
2,663TD÷77,658TC= 0.0342913802%DR
2,660D÷77,700C=0.0342342342
 * Some dates have multiple figures due to China changing the methods used to calculate and diagnose cases and news media reports with varying numbers. Regardless, my calculations show an increasing mortality rate.
‐--------------------------
  1. Projected Total Deaths in China by 22 Feb 2020 :
12 Feb 2020 projected death total by 22 Feb at current daily death rate: Rate increase next 10 days by a factor of 10. 108+118+128+138+148 +158+168+178+188+198 −108 = 1,422 calculated daily deaths + 1,113 Death total as of 12 Feb 2020 = 2,535 Deaths by 22 Feb 2020
‐--------------------------
  1. Projected total death from Diamond Princess case study:
~17-18 deaths based on number of cases and current death rate in China
634 cases×0.026959628 =17.092404152 634 cases×0.0284119872 =18.0131998848
  1. China COVID-19 (coronavirus) momentum analysis : Source: https://www.wsj.com/
China's first known case: 1Dec 2019 1 case
12Jan 2020 40cases 53 days elapsed 40÷53=.75 cases per day
30Jan 2018 9,658 cases 18 days elapsed 9,618÷18=534.3333333333 cases per day
18Feb 2020 75,152 cases 19 days elapsed 65,534÷19=3,449.1578947368 cases per day
Total days since onset: 75,152 cases ÷80days = 939.4 cases a day
  1. Japan Momentum Analysis:
Japan's first case: 15 January 21 Feb 104 cases
37 day window based on China's rate of infection. 37×.75=27 to (37×939.4=) 34,757.8 cases
104÷27=3.8518518519 x 37=142.5185185203
3.8518518519×.75=2.8888888889 ×37=106.8888888893 cases
22 feb cases expected to be between 106 or 142 and upwards to 34,757.8 as yet unidentified cases based on the momentum of the coronavirus spread in China. Population density considered, but not factored in.
*Another method of calculating infected populations based on population density of cities in China that have been infected.
China number of cases since onset to the number of days of country's current onset÷ city populations infected = percentage infected based on population ÷ number of days
  1. Global projected death toll based on calculated Death Rate:
2,130Deaths÷75,700Cases=0.0281373844%
Projected worldwide deaths: 7,700,000,000 (world population) ×.028 (Death rate)=215,600,000 deaths
24 Feb 2020 Italy 7D÷229C=0.0305676856%DR
Iran 12D÷64=0.1875%DR
26 Feb 2020 South Korea
?D÷1,261C=
12D÷1,146C=0.0104712042%DR
Source: Watch "ARIRANG NEWS [FULL]: Number of confirmed COVID-19 patients in Korea up to 893" on YouTube https://youtu.be/R1JYnnj38mQ
  1. Japan cities with cases of coronavirus:
Hokkaido, Saitama, Yokohama, Tokyo, Chiba, Ishikawa, Kanagawa, Nara, Aichi, Mie, Wakayama, Osaka, Kyoto, Fukuoka, Kumamoto
Image date: 23 Feb 2020
  1. Cruise ships
Five cruise ships including Diamond Princess, World Dream, Anthem of Seas, Westerdam and Costa Smeralda have been quarantined after news of possible infections emerged.
  1. Eyes of Darkness, Dean R. Koontz, pseudonym Leigh Nichols A chilling parallel to the current crisis.
  2. Suggestions to protect yourself and stop spreading the virus
Hand washing: Wash with warm to hot not cold water. Ever since the 2008 recession, many stores have switched off the hot water to bathroom sinks. Cold water is not preferred for cleaning.
Faucets: Should be Touchless
Every time you touch the knobs on a faucet, you are risking infection from everyone else that has touched it. Sure you are washing, but then you touch it again to turn it off. Besides, why risk it in the first place? It may be all the virus needs to get a foothold.
Pump soaps, sanitizers: Should be Touchless Same as faucets.
I remember watching people suiting up to go into a room in ICU, Intensive Care Unit. They pushed the button on the sanitizer and cleaned their hands before going into the room and when they came out. Each time taking a chance of becoming infected.
Toilets: Touchless
Same as faucets, soaps and hand sanitizers
Hand drying: Air dryers are notorious for spreading germs
Toilet tissue, paper towels or napkins:
Use these when in a non touchless situation to minimize infection risk.
Shoes:
Sanitize shoes
Potential virus transfer from urinals, toilets, sidewalks, buses, trains, stores, etc, to your car and into your,home, office, place of work, liesure.
Sanitize clothing:
Sitting down in public spaces and then your car, couch, etc
Contact points:
Be wary of contact points and transference of germs/viruses into areas that were previously germ/virus free.
  1. Additional sources used:
https://www.wsj.com/
http://global.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202002/21/WS5e2a95d9a310128217273202.html
https://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/202002/15/WS5e474b4ca310128217277bb1.html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/u-raises-japan-warning-surge-214533960.html

submitted by abaraxus to u/abaraxus [link] [comments]


2019.09.26 11:23 weilim JAW-JAW: CHINA’S GREAT POWER DISEASE (EDWARD LUTTWAK)

Couple of months there was an podcast by Edward Luttwak, a political scientist with War on the Rocks. According to him, China suffers from Great Power Disease. T
What I said is that all great powers are much less aware of the outside world than small powers. Simply because there’s so much going on inside them. They only have so many decision-makers. In the end you have executives, one or two, United States has one, in some other countries it’s two or three. They only have one set of ears and eyes and tongue. And if they’re getting a lot of input from inside the country their ability to focus on outside is less. Now in the Chinese case, first of all it’s the biggest country in terms of population.
The argument forms the first part of his book the Rise of China: The Logic of Strategy written in 2012. The book is divided into three sections which can be summarized as 1) Chinese Great Power Autism (shortcomings in how China perceives the world) 2) Logic of Strategy and Reaction to China's Rise 3) How various states would react to China's rise. In this discussion I will concentrate on summarizing and commenting on the first two sections Chinese Great Power Autism and Logic of Strategy and Reacion to China's Rise.
Some Western Sinoolgist view that an equilibrium will emerge in Asia where countries will just accept a Chinese regional order doesn't take into account the intellectual, cultural, economic and demographic shifts that have occurred in the Asia and world over the last 500 years. Luttwak believes countries' will react to China's rise, and there will be a reaction from China, and strategic competition spirals into a OODA Loop,
LUTTWAK'S WORKS
Edward Luttwak is a controversial figure.. He is know for advocating the bombing of North Korea and for prolonging From an academic standpoint his most controversial work was written over 40 years ago, titled The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire: From the First Century CE to the Third. While many historians of the Rome Empire now say the work is outdated and accuses Luttwak of applying a 19th century view of strategy to antiquity; however, some disagree and believe Luttwak raises an important point to what extent did the Romans had a strategy. In my opinion it ot boils down to how you define strategy. Is strategy just a plan, or more broadly as plan, pattern, ploy, position and perspective. When Luttwak wrote the Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire he did it for a PhD for International Relations, and it was immediately controversial. He raised some important questions in a subject that has been discussed and researched for over a millenia. He followed in 2000 with another work titled Grand Strategy of the Byzantine Empire. I would say this second book is far superior to his The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire. These two books help forms the framework of how he looks at China and strategy.'
The second of Edward Luttwak's works that is important for this discussion is Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace. In this review, the reviewer says that
For example, common sense might dictate that the best way to defend a country is by ranging forces along its borders, thereby preventing an enemy from ravaging the lands which lie beyond. In point of fact, however, defense in depth, allowing an enemy to penetrate unprotected settled areas, may prove the best way of defeating him by sudden counterattack; deliberately to make oneself vulnerable is thus to make oneself strong.
The reason for this is
The central cause of this paradoxical logic—and I have not done justice to the imaginative and wide range of historical examples Luttwak invokes to illustrate it—is the fact that in war one deals with an opponent who reacts. War is most emphatically not like building a bridge over a treacherous river. Dangerous as that latter enterprise might be, a river does not consciously devise novel means to wash away abutments, drown construction workers, and generally thwart the engineer.
In his book Rise of China and the Logic of Strategy and this discussion he merges the framework used in Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire with the central idea from Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace, which he says
No matter at what level, from a knife fight in an alley to the multidimensional and multilateral engagements of grand strategy in peacetime, the logic is the always the same: action -- in the case of growth of power, evokes reaction, which need not stop the action but which does prohibit its simple, linear progress.
In this case, because of the mounting opposition it if evoking. China's continued and rapid growth in economic capacity and military strength and regional and global influence cannot simply persist. If Chinese leaders ignore the warning signs and forge ahead, the paradoxical logic will ensure that instead of accumulating more power, they will remain with less was resistance mounts.
Many China hands have criticized the book on what Luttwak gets wrong about today's China and its history. Luttwak makes it clear from the beginning that his main aim of writing the books is to find out whether or not China has a "Strategy". He says no.
Secondly, unlike most authors on China and the US, he devotes the last and third part of the book how China's neighbors have responded to her rise. While many of his predictions are outdated, the most important aspect is he doesn't place US at the center of the rivalry. As in the Cold War, in a great power struggle, it is countries at the periphery that are important..In the podcast and in the book, he talks about how Australia and Japan were talking about containing China early than the Americans.
Australia, which was the first country to do a lot of theory about China, 2008 with the white paper, sorry, 2009. Very quickly they said we’ve got to contain them, then the Japanese get on board only 2012, Americans really only after Obama left. Maritime powers confronting a land power don’t just build ships to face this navy this land power sends out to sea.
This explains why Japan and Australia banned Huawei, they had concerns about China long before the US had. The US can exploit the country's fear of China, but can't create fear where it doesn't exist before.

APPROACH

This is going to be a very long post, and will be the first post in 4 post I am still working on the other post, but they will be titled as follows
The second post will to add additional cognitive biases that impact China's strategic decision making which Luttwark doesn't mention, and elaborate on how they impact's China external relations.. The last post will talk about China's current geopolitical situation VIA SONG DYNASTY 960-1279 AND JAPAN INTERWAR YEARS 1919-1945. Why do I pick these two events? These two events are the only two events in Asian geopolitics that truly global or pan-Asian impact that occur within a short period. While European colonization impacted Asia significantly it occurred over a 500 year period. Secondly, the Song Dynasty's conflict with the Mongol fell within a time period that ethnic Han Dynasty formally recognized another kingdom as equal (Liao), and later on subservient (Jin). There are many parallels with the Song Dynasty interactions with the three barbarians people (Khitan, Jurchen and Mongols) and current day China and the US.
If anyone wants to learn more about these events here is a good channel on Grand Strategy called Strategy Stuff. When Caspian Report needs someone to explain a historical event they go Strategy Stuff. Here are links to relevant videos.
I would say of all the geopolitics youtube channels, this is the one channel that is the closest to geopolitics as it was originally defined. Many other channels like Caspian Report are more IR. The only problem is the author;s focus is largely historical.
The recommended reading list on the channel includes some books usually found on a typical IR list, but many others that aren't. The Rise of China: Logic of Strategy and Luttwak book Coup D'Etat is also included. To be honest, when people talk about geopolitics, this is what should pop up most in people's minds.

SUMMARY

The podcast is really the first couple of chapters of Luttwak's book, so what I will do is summarize important sections of his book that the podcast didn't cover. After each chapter I provide my opinion on the chapter. In his podcast, he talks about technology and spying, I will leave those out, because they aren't covered in the book. Secondly, to spare you from having to read the book, I have listed some articles and videos of Luttwak talking about the book and how its applies to Asian geopolitics.
LUTTWAK VIDEOS AND ARTICLES ABOUT RISE OF CHINA: LOGIC OF STRATEGY
The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy with Edward Luttwak a Q&A video with Luttwak
US military historian Edward Luttwak advices India to cultivate friendly ties with neighbours
Detailed Review of Rise of China: Logic of Strategy
Edward Luttwak: Global Cold War Strategy. This was originally published in Japanese, but has reprinted in English. Its a a 4 part interview.
What Edward Luttwak spends 50% of his book talking about is talk about biases and shortcomings of Chinese strategic thinking / culture. He has done similar works for the Russians and the US. Throughout the book Rise of China: Logic of Strategy he points which biases are universal or common to big countries like the US and China, and others which are unique to China.
GREAT STATE AUTISM
Luttwak like all big countries including the US and India, suffers from big state autism. Leaders are often preoccupied domestic concerns to focus on foreign relations. However, Luttwak argues that chinese great state autism is particular bad for several reasons.
  1. Strong Held Image of their relations with outside world. Her traditional centrality, and defensive posture
  2. There is a emphasis on diplomatic ceremony among the Chinese leadership. I would say the CPC is very good at using protocol to put you in your place, but I wouldn't call them experts at protocol, that would belong to monarchies like the Japanese and Thais.
  3. [BOOK] Don't have ideological or democratic legitimacy. That is why they react harshly to even the smallest disturbance.
  4. [BOOK] Mirror imaging. Think others think like you would be in that position. Because of their preoccupation with internal affairs, they take the shortcut. In reality it is very difficult to put oneself in another man’s shoes, and it is more difficult the more different that other man is. Leaders with political skills like to believe they are ‘people persons’ and understand people in general, and combined with a characteristic overconfidence in their own abilities, they are are greatly tempted to underestimate real differences and to overestimate their actual ability to handle relations with foreigners. NOT UNIQUE TO CHINA
2008/2009 MARKED A CHANGE IN THE PEACEFUL RISE OF CHINA TO A MORE AGGRESSIVE STANCE
Luttwak believes there was a change in China's Peaceful Rise strategy after the Financial Crisis. The incident marking the change was the seizing of Scarborough Shoal in 2012, and Luttwak faults the Obama administration for not reacting forcibly enough. However, he doesn't fault the Obama administration entirely because since the death of Mao Zedong, the optimist were right about China, things were getting better both externally and internally. Even now things are getting better.
From the time Mao died, September 1976, I happened to be in Beijing, and I happened to be invited to the Great Hall of the People and actually saw the body of Mao. There’s a photograph of me standing over the body of Mao with a gang of four around me, which was a strange thing to me. From that moment on, from the time Mao died, only the optimists were right. Only the doves were right. All the people who said that the Chinese would collapse were wrong, the people who said the Chinese were going to be aggressive were wrong, the people who were alarmed about Taiwan were wrong, and the only correct interpretation was the Susan Rice interpretation.
Then, in 2004 this benign view of China is confirmed by the Chinese themselves through the publication of the peaceful rise speech, an article which was backed up. So by late 2004 the only people who have a negative view of China are people who have ignored all the real things that have happened. There’s a steady improvement in everything. And by the way, some of these improvements continue to this day.
NOTE: For people in trade and investment, they noticed a shift in 2006/2007, when the Chinese started dragging their feet regarding WTO commitments. I think that could be as a precursor. However, that being said, if one looks at ideological debates in CPC, you could seen ideological strains of the current leadership dating back to the mid 1990s ranging from such things as handling minorities etc.
A popular counter argument is Obama started it with the ASIA PIVOT. This is Luttwak opinion, and he talked to Mainland Chinese officials and analyst to reach his conclusion.
READ HISTORY
Luttwak concludes by saying people shouldn't spend a lot of time reading any contemporary books on China, but read their history.
NOTE: I agree with this. If you want to understand China-Japanese relations read the history of China-Japanese relations. Its so simple, but few people actually do it, outside of specialist. The reasons for this is Chinese foreign relations community and area experts are dominated by historians, that stems from the Imperial tradition of having court historians, but also because other social scientist like political science are more ideological.
My view on this is many commentators on China focus on histories of conflict between Chinese states to gain insight into Chinese strategic thinking. First, the reason for this is paucity of records involving many of China's neighbors, particularly the Steppe nomads. Secondly, is how history is taught in the Chinese speaking world is how history was taught in the West 100 years ago, there was a lot more emphasis on Classical history (Greco-Roman History) than there is now. Secondly, A good example is few Chinese know about Sino-Burmese War in the 18th century or the Sino-French War in 19th century, but many Chinese could talk about every battle of the Three Kingdoms period is.
PREMATURE ASSERTIVENESS [BOOK]
Luttwak mentions several non-exclusive theories as to origin of China’s premature assertiveness.
  1. China’s rulers have been made unhinged by their sudden rise of fortune
  2. China’s multitude of uncoordinated and effectively independent governmental institutions, ‘go rogue’ and pursue their own agendas at the expense of the national interest.
  3. As above, since 2008, China’s leaders believe that threats and provocations aren’t as offensive as they really are, and are instead beneficial in that they induce others to negotiate over long festering and unresolved disputes in a conciliatory manner.
The third explanation is most accurate and contradicts in practice the officially promulgated Chinese policy of ‘Peaceful Development’ (Zhongguo heping fazhan) or ‘Peaceful Rise’ (Zhongguo heping jueqi). But the second explanation has some truth to it as well, and it in a desperate and simultaneously untrusted attempt to get the thousand, Dr. Strangelove-esque minds-of-their-own-tentacles of the Chinese government apparatus on board, senior officials have occasionally had to issue memoranda reminding people that they are supposed to be committed to an accommodative and unaggressive policy.
HISTORICAL RESIDUES IN CHINA'S CONDUCT [BOOK]
Luttwak describes the Historical Residues in China's Conduct as follows
  1. A Hierarchical System with China at the top and center vs Formal Equality Culminated in the Peace of Westphalia 1648. The Chinese name for this notion – which emerged under the Western Han dynasty (206-9 BC) – is Tianxia (all under heaven)
  2. Barbarian Handling which has three components a) Induced economic dependence; one might even say, ‘addiction’ or ‘corruption’ b) Indoctrination into the Confucian value system and the behavioral norms of the Han c) The effect is to make the barbarians “… psychologically as well as economically dependent on the imperial radiance.”
  3. Three legacies of Tributary System in Chinese Diplomacy according to Luttwak a) Focus of Pomp and Ceremony of Even Head of State / Officials of Minor Countries. To show the power b) Reward visitors with memorable gifts to ensure visitors are eager to visit again c) Positive coverage of visits by leaders of African countries by the official Chinese media d) Bilateralism. Luttwak provides the example of China's dealing with ASEAN over the South China Seas. Of course in this instance bilateralism favors China, but Luttwak says it is also rooted in Chinese diplomatic culture. I think the reason why China does this is to win support in the UN General Assembly
Luttwak says many would think his portrayal of China's foreign affairs being influenced by Tianxia is illegitimate and smacks of Orientalism, Luttwak illustrates this by describing a workshop hosted by the Confucius Institute with Stanford in 2011 "A Tianxia Workshop: Culture, International Relations and World History. Rethinking Chinese Perceptions of the World Order"
The practical value of the traditional Chinese vision of world order, or tianxia … [is that] … this vision anchors a universal authority in the moral, ritualistic, and aesthetic framework of a secular high culture, while providing social and moral criteria for assessing fair, humanitarian governance and proper social relations. Varied discourses indebted to tianxia have resurfaced in modern China in quest of moral and cultural ways of relating to and articulating an international society. We believe that the Chinese vision may prove productive … in the tension-ridden yet interconnected world.
NOTE: This section is the weakest part of the book. First, as for the hierarchical system system favored by China is really an extension of hierarchical Confucian system at home. Professor Wang Gongwu has an interesting lecture on the Chinese difficulty in accepting Western concepts of international law, while the Japanese were quick to embrace it, because it offered a way out of the hierarchical Confucian world order that they deeply resented. The various Chinese dynasties used different methods with the barbarians. Here ia good illustration and criticism to Luttwak analysis of China's barbarian handling methods. However, the problem with this analysis, is until the Mongol invasions, the distinctions between Hua (Han CHinese) vs Yi (Barbarian) was blurred. The cultural exchange wasn't one way, and even during the Yuan and Qing Dynasties, the transmissions of culture was both ways.
Getting back to Luttwak premise and the China relations with her neighbors, you can see this in the use of carrot/stick in her diplomacy with smaller countries like South Korea, Philippines, Canada, Japan, New Zealand etc. When the country does something that displeases China, they resort to holding back trade or access. The problem as Asymmetry and China's Tributary System argues relations can never get beyond a certain point, or worsen and the two parties spend the next couple of years trying to repair the damage. Take for example, the case with South Korea. Relations have improved since the bottom of the THAAD crisis, but it will take years to restore relations back to pre-THAAD levels.
I think Luttwak is being disingenuous here with the lectures by the Confucius Institute on Tianxia. There are many public intellectual in China peddling theories. Some in the Chinese public might be naive to accept it, but the reality is the only real way to understand how Chinese diplomacy works is to observe what Chinese diplomats do.
ANCIENT UNWISDOM [BOOK]
Remarkably undiminished by the actual record of Chinese history, with its repeated subjugations by relatively small numbers of primitive invaders, this great confidence in Chinese strategic abilities reflects the immense prestige of China’s ancient writings on statecraft and the art of war …
Luttwak respects Sun Tzu’s The Art of War for its concise expression of timeless and paradoxical strategic truths. However, according to Luttwak, the problem with Art of War, unlike Clausewitz on War is it doesn't explain the reasoning step by step. Chinese generals were only able to adapt its lessons successfully when they were fighting other Chinese generals during periods of Warring States. It was similar to the situation in Renaissance Iltay
Luttwak detects three residue of the Art of War mentality of the misapplication of intracultural norms to intercultural conflict.
  1. The presumption of unlimited pragmatism (or rational greed) in inter-state relations. NOT UNIQUE TO THE CHINESE
  2. The tendency of Chinese officialdom to believe that long-unresolved disputes with foreign countries can be resolved by deliberately provoking a crisis. Luttwak makes references to the South China Seas.
  3. An exaggerated faith in the power and efficacy of deception, as well as of the strategems and surprise moves that deception allows. On the issue of deception he talks about senior officers of the PLAN talking about decapitation strikes on one aircraft carrier in the hope of demoralizing an opponent as an example.
The effectiveness of deception and related methods is immensely increased by proximity, familiarity, consanguinity, cultural homogeneity, and easy access, all of which facilitate the acquisition of indispensable in-depth knowledge of the adversary.
He also talks about how Chinese often say that China is too difficult for foreigners to understand
In another leftover from the tributary past, the Han usually attribute superior cunning to themselves as compared to the non-Han of the world, as well as more elevated virtues, of course. Americans, on the other hand, they see as especially naive, also as strong and perhaps violent, but easily manipulated. “It is not easy to really know China because China is an ancient civilization … [whereas] the American people, they’re [danchun] very simple [or naive, or innocent— in the original].” Thus spoke Vice-Premier Wang Qishan on May 11, 2011, extemporaneously in a television discussion, while in Washington as head of the economic side of the annual China-U.S. strategic summit
Luttwak goes on about how the Chinese often attribute the actions of others to have an ulterior motive, rather than treating it at face value or ideology. NOT UNIQUE TO THE CHINESE. YOU SEE IT IN THIS SUB. PEOPLE CAN TALK ENDLESSLY ABOUT THE US MOTIVES FOR TRADE WAR WITHOUT ACTUALLY MENTIONING UTSR DOCUMENTS SENT TO CONGRESS
NOTE: On first principle you see that not only with how China deals with foreign states, but with ethnic minorities as well whether Muslims, Tibetans and Hong Kong. This is compounded by the fact China is Communist and looks at everything through a Marxist lens only worsens the problem. Secondly, the CPC has what I call a typical Confucian bureaucrat mentality is they look at things often with a dogmatic lens. They assume they know what people want, and are prone to lecturing people like they are 3 year olds.
As for the second principle, sometimes she provokes a crisis mainly to test resolve and ascertain the actions of the opponent. However, in Singapore they call it creating a false dilemma
Speaking at a recent SMU-SOSS International and Asian Studies Workshop titled “Navigating the Global Power Shift: China’s Rise and President Trump’s America”, Kausikan explained the Chinese practice of creating a false dilemma: If you want China to co-operate with you in one area, do not interfere with Chinese interests in some other area. In the case of Singapore, it was ostensibly Taiwan, where the Terrexes had been on a regular SAF exercise before heading back to Singapore.
“They wanted to negotiate with us but we refused,” recounts Kausikan, a Senior Fellow at the SMU School of Social Sciences. “We would fall into their trap of choosing [an option presented by] a false dilemma if we did. They would have started talking about phasing out the training in Taiwan in 10 years, we would then counter with eight, and they would then propose seven and so forth; there would be no end to it.
About the comments about the Americans being naive or innocent, the Indian author, V. Raghunathan, "Indians are Privately Smart Publically Dumb" the same could be said to extent with the Chinese
V. Raghunathan writes about a farmer whose corn won top awards year after year. When a reporter asked about the secret of his success, the farmer attributed it to the fact that he shared his corn with his neighbors. Why, the reporter wondered, would the farmer want to share his seed when those neighbors also competed with him for the prize? The farmer’s reply was, “The wind picks up pollen from the ripening corn and swirls it from field to field. If my neighbors grew inferior corn, cross-pollination would steadily degrade the quality of my corn. If I am to grow good corn, I must help my neighbors do the same.” .
INEVITABLE ANALOGY [BOOK]
In a chapter called “The Inevitable Analogy” Luttwak compares a rising Chinese superpower to its closest Historical analogue, pre-WWI Germany, which, as early as 1890 has already overtaken British primary in countless academic, industrial, and economic trades and was utterly unmatched in the critical chemical sector.
Between the end of the 19th century and 1904, Britain, recognizing the emerging German threat, scrambled to make friends of past enemies, and give up a great many just but disputed claims to negotiate as many separate agreements as possible, especially with France and Russia. The result was comprehensive encirclement and the gradual strengthening of the anti-German Anglo-Franco-Russo alliance. The bottom line is that the very existence of Germany’s growing strength mobilized the British to oppose Germany globally. Luttwak claims:
… only a militarily nonthreatening and diplomatic conciliatory grand strategy could have served Germany well – accelerating its peacful rise to new heights of cultural prosperity – is obvious in retrospect. But by 1907, and indeed long before, that best strategy had become simply unthinkable for Germany’s political elite ….
NOTE: Luttwak makes some interesting points here. However, in part a nation's ability to implement a "diplomatic revolution" as with Britain engagement with France in the 1800s is that in most of world history, such examples are rare. I think Luttwak downplays the importance of regime ideology and structure when it comes to forming long term alliances post-1815. It wasn't so much British strategic genius, but France had made cultural/strategic leaps necessary to make the British comfortable with a long term alliance. Bourgeois France of the 1904 was very different from the revolutionary France of 1804. The British could have joined Triple Alliance, and was close to doing so in 1890s. It requires a level of desperation / desire, and many would not contemplate. A contemporary example is Ethiopia transition to democracy and its peace with Eritrea, all within a span of months
A past example related to Britain, would be the union of England and Scotland. From 1298-1400, the English launched 8 invasions into Scotland, with the aim of stopping Scottish raids. This resulted in the Auld Alliance between France and Scotland to counter the English, even though it didn't stop English invasions. The English and Scottish signed the Treaty of Perpetual in 1503, even though it was broken in 1513, it formed the basis for the Union of the Crowns in 1603, and eventually the Act of Union in 1703. The peace and eventual Union between England and Scotland, enabled the English to devote its energy to Europeans affairs without the fear of Continental Powers reciprocating and also allowed them to focus their attention overseas. From initial peace treaty to the union, there was opposition on both sides. Successful execution of a grand strategy in most regions only happens once every hundred years, and even attempts are rare. The biggest problem is it often works subconsciously and with different motives in mind
CHINA'S AGGRANDIZEMENT AND GLOBAL REACTIONS [BOOK]
China's Increasing military spending could stem from a desire to
  1. Increase military prestige
  2. Intimated and attack defiant non-nuclear powers
  3. Localized escalation domination
In the article, Luttwak talks about US having aircraft carriers, so China should get them too.
Luttwak argues that unacknowledged subordination have its advocates. Policies of accommodation to Chinese preferences leading to China's hegemony will unlikely overcome politics of resistance
When the US extended its influence over East Asia in the 1940s it was often seen as generous rather predatory. China is often viewed as predatory because of its large current deficits, even though China has increasing its investment in the region. Luttwak presents a public opinion of China regarding its economic activity increasing both regionally and globally. Emergence of China';s as a military power evokes stronger reaction.
NOTE: China's favorability ratings have dropped on average since 2011. When the US extended its influence in East and SEA in the 1940-50s it was seen as good, because what came before it was bad - European colonialism and Japanese occupation. Countries in the region, particularly Southeast Asia, want to get the benefits of cooperating with both the US and China.
The biggest problem with China is that can't cover most Asian countries if the US and the EU decide restrict exports to it. Here is an article about China and Cambodia
Today, more than 60% of Cambodia’s gross domestic product (GDP) derives from exports, with the vast majority coming from garment and footwear shipments. Last year, Cambodia’s exports to all international markets were worth just over $12.1 billion, up 10% from the previous year, and could tip the $13 billion mark at the end of 2019,...In 2017, China imported a little under $700 million worth of Cambodian goods; the US imported $3.1 billion and the EU $5.7 billion, most of which came under the EBA scheme. Exports to the US rose by about US$700 million last year, the same as China’s total annual imports from Cambodia.
This is China's closest ally in Southeast Asia, and even though China promises to increase trade to US$10 Billion by 2023, its most likely going to operate in her favor. Outside of South Korea and Japan, most countries in Asia have large deficits with China. The investment that countries receive from China is usually only a fraction of trade deficits they have with China. While some people have criticized Trump's tariffs, but the reality is Trump's tariffs haven't touched developing Asia outside of China. If one looks at the trade dispute Trump initially had with South Korea, which he eventually signed the US-ROK FTA with a few minor adjustment, how does that compare with China's boycotts over THAAD. When Trump threatened with walking away from US-ROK FTA unless it was negotiated, it was only him. When China boycotts a country, China has to get the whole country behind. To South Koreans its far more threatening than dealing with an individual.
THE COMING GEOECONOMIC RESISTANCE TO THE RISE OF CHINA [BOOK]
By “Geo-Economic” Luttwak refers to his thesis of how modern conflicts will be conducted amongst Great Powers, in ways that resemble the Cold War. The era of large conventional warfare between large nations was over in WWII, and the importance of global trade and economic concerns has expanded dramatically. He says:
That is so because in our nuclear age, with any significant warfare between nuclear powers largely inhibited, the logic of strategy must find alternative, nonmilitary expression in “geo-economic” ways.
But despite the US elite commitment to free trade – most intensely expounded from its stronghold in the US Treasury Department – intellectual support for geo-economic resistance is building if, for no other reason, than the growing recognition of multiple downsides to the Chinese trade relationship.
NOTE: Interesting thing about Luttwak's comments is he doesn't mention this chapter in the interview, even though he does talk about the trade war. The problem with political scientist talking about economics is they focus on state actors, even though much of the actions will be conducted by non-state actors, and many of them aren't even Chinese or America companies. The trade war is really the West's turn in moving away from investing in China, just as the Anti-Japanese riots in 2012 did to Japanese investments, and the THAAD 2017 accelerated investment away from China for the South Koreans. In both the Japanese and South Korea case, China responded to both incidents by using economic punishment. The Japanese and South Korean response of their companies was to pull out of China or shift new investment elsewhere.
COULD CHINA ADOPT A SUCCESSFUL GRAND STRATEGY? [BOOK]
Before abruptly changing course in 2008, China attempted to calm everyone’s nerves by issuing forth a policy document in 2005 that attempted to communicate their non-threatening intentions about what they planned on doing with their rapidly expanding power. China would:
  1. Not Seek to create its own world system, but would rather join in the existing system.
  2. Not Seek regional, let alone global, hegemony, hence military forces will not threaten or deliberately intimidate other countries.
  3. Not Use force over territorial and maritime disputes, but resolve them diplomatically.
  4. Not Use the economy to accumulate military strength as the Soviet Union has done.
  5. Not Disrupt the economies of other countries for its own benefit. It would seek to repress the theft of intellectual property while respecting the common rules on international trade.
  6. Peacefully reabsorb Hong Kong and Macau, and moreover, so long as Taiwan’s identity as a province of China was not challenged, no force would be used against the island.
Luttwak comments:
“… these reassuring promises were presented by successive Chinese leaders in credible ways, and – more important – because actual Chinese conduct kept faith with these promises in the years 2005-2008, there was no ‘natural’ reaction to China’s extremely rapid rise: no elements, even tacit, of any anti-Chinese alliance emerged on its periphery, and there was not even any speculation about the attempt to deliberately slow China’s economic growth.”“Until 2009 the credibility of the Peaceful Rise grant strategy was reaffirmed by actual Chinese conduct. But that is no longer true of course …”
In the book Luttwak provides reasons as to why it is unlikely 1) Abnormal to adopt a humble policy given China's increasing overall power 2) Abnormal to keep a small military given China's increasing economy 3) Abnormal for the PLA to accept a reduced role 4) Public Opinion, in so much that it counts, would find it unacceptable given China's humiliating past. To accept a more modest posture would diminish China's standing of her smaller neighbors

C

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2019.09.03 13:58 jtcd Why the Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act Should Protect Non-Religious Groups From Religious Hate Speech

Why the Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act Should Protect Non-Religious Groups From Religious Hate Speech

Tl;dr: The updated Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act (MRHA) will not protect non-religious folks from religious hate speech. This lack of protection causes asymmetric relationships between religious and non-religious folks. Such relationships cause animosity toward religious folks, thereby undermining religious harmony. MRHA should include protections for non-religious folks.

MRHA

At present, the following is what MRHA covers with regard to hate speech:
Section 8(1) of the MRHA permits the Minister for Home Affairs to make a restraining order against any priest, monk, pastor, imam, elder, office-bearer or any other person who is in a position of authority in any religious group or institution where the Minister is satisfied that the person has committed or is attempting to commit any of the following acts:   (a) causing feelings of enmity, hatred, ill-will or hostility between different religious groups; (b) carrying out activities to promote a political cause, or a cause of any political party while, or under the guise of, propagating or practising any religious belief; (c) carrying out subversive activities under the guise of propagating or practising any religious belief; or (d) exciting disaffection against the President or the Government while, or under the guise of, propagating or practising any religious belief.   In addition to the persons mentioned above, under section 9(1) of the MRHA the Minister may also make an order against any other persons where the Minister is satisfied that (a) the person is inciting, instigating or encouraging any religious group or religious institution or any person mentioned in section 8(1) to commit any of the acts specified in that subsection; or that (b) the person, who is not one of the > persons mentioned in section 8(1), has caused or is attempting to cause feelings of enmity, hatred, ill-will or hostility between different religious groups.
Recently proposed changes consolidate existing penal code laws relating to religion under MRHA. These laws cover acts that:
  • incite violence on the basis of religion or against a religious group or its members
  • incite feelings of enmity, hatred, ill-will or hostility against a religious group
  • insult the religion or wound the religious feelings of another person

Asymmetric Relationships

Religious folks can make derogatory remarks about their non-religious peers. Non-religious folks have no means of recourse.
For example, consider evangelist Daniel Kolenda. Cornerstone Community Church have invited him to preach at their Kingdom Invasion event scheduled for March 2020. Daniel Kolenda has made derogatory statements about Atheists:
Consider the hypothetical case of an Atheist making similar statements:
I have been among Atheists all my life, but I have never seen the dogmatism and blind faith demonstrated by these Christians... I don’t believe in Christians. They are at war, not with reality, but with themselves. They are as conflicted as a child denying its mother. This is why their resistance seems painful and passionate – not what you would expect from someone denying a fairytale. They are rejecting irrefutable facts and logic. It must be an extremely itchy existence “kicking against the goads.”
 
The Christian is a fool because he thinks there is a god. If we obsess over the divine, we are functional Christians thinking like fools.
Christians would have valid reason to take offence. MRHA provides them with a way to compel the Atheist to moderate his tone - rightly so - we should avoid needless conflict. Atheists on the other hand, have no means of compelling Daniel Kolenda to moderate his tone. Some might feel that MRHA creates an asymmetric relationship where religious folks have the power both to offend and to muzzle anyone who offends them.

Pent-up Animosity

Some non-religious folks hold grievances over the behaviour of their religious peers. This is evident in online forums, including Singapore, where grudges are regularly brought up, to list a few: hate speech against LGBT’s, the Aware saga, campaigns to influence HPB’s science based data, dominionism, greedy churches, NCCS trying to dictate how freethinkers celebrate Christmas.
Asymmetric relationships between religious and non-religious folks compound these grievances - unable to speak plainly about their opposition to what religious folks do while being persecuted with no means of recourse, pent-up animosity toward religious folks is festering.
This pent-up animosity is a fault line hidden just out of sight. We’ve already felt tremors from this fault line. Consider the Watain ban: some saw it as “yet another” case of Christians overstepping their boundaries. Because of all the pent-up animosity, anti-Christian vitriol was rife. Distrust of and animosity toward Christians is so severe that even the government's impartiality was questioned. Religious harmony took a hit.
I dread the fallout over the next contentious issue involving Christians and the public sphere, we might get rocked by a society-splitting quake one day.

Conclusion

The religious - non-religious fault line is as real as fault lines between any pair of religions. Consider the US, where the right-left divide strongly correlates with the religious - non-religious divide. Unfortunately for the US, theirs is a gaping fault line devoid of the slightest modicum of civility. Each side has dehumanized the other through hate speech, to the point where constructive discussions on difficult issues seem nigh impossible. That is not the case here, yet.
While we can, we should nip the fault line in the bud by requiring both sides to treat each other with respect. Disagree, but without denigrating. Vitriolic hate speech that sows animosity and dehumanizes groups should not be allowed. People like Daniel Kolenda should not be allowed to preach here.
In particular, MRHA’s protections should come with the caveat of restricting religious folks from spewing hate against groups not protected by MRHA. They should not be allowed to use their bully pulpits to stoke anti-religious sentiments among the non-religious. Also, representatives of non-religious groups should be included in the community remediation initiative.
In the 30 years since MRHA was first passed, the proportion of non-religious Singaporeans has grown significantly. In fact, nones are the fastest growing "religious" group right now. It is folly to ignore the non-religious and to allow animosity between them and religious folks to fester.
There is little cost to including protections for non-religious groups. Religions do not need to denigrate to remain relevant and be of value to society. I respect Christ. He didn't disparage and attack everyone who disagreed with him. Christ inspired people by showing unconditional love, by empathizing with the weak, the poor, the outcasts, by being there for them in their time of need. Through his humility and selflessness, he has inspired billions - far more than any hate spewing religious type has or will.
Coincidentally, Lou Engle, a prominent dominionist, was banned from Singapore after speaking at the event Daniel Kolenda is slated to speak at. Dominionism explicitly rejects separation of church and state, advocating Christian influence over politics, education, arts and more. The group behind it, New Apostolic Reformation, counted Lawrence Khong as one of their apostles. Hopefully, updates to MRHA pertaining to foreign influence help weed dominionism out.
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2019.08.09 00:01 autotldr Analysts: China continued Iran oil imports in July in teeth of U.S. sanctions

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 72%. (I'm a bot)
SINGAPORE/BEIJING - China imported Iranian crude oil in July for the second month since a U.S. sanctions waiver ended, according to research from three data firms, with one estimate showing some oil entered tanks holding the country's strategic reserves.
The imports are continuing at a precarious moment in U.S.-China relations: The flow is hampering U.S. President Donald Trump's efforts to choke off oil exports vital to Iran through sanctions, just as tensions rise in the festering U.S.-China trade dispute that has cast a pall over the global economy.
China is typically Iran's largest oil customer and contests Washington's sanctions.
Asked if U.S. sanctions apply in the case of Beijing storing Iranian oil in SPR facilities, a State Department official told Reuters Washington does not preview sanctions activities as it seeks to force Tehran to accept stricter limits on its nuclear activity and policy in the Gulf.
In July, Washington sanctioned state-run Chinese oil trader Zhuhai Zhenrong Co for allegedly violating restrictions imposed on Iran's oil sector.
Elizabeth Rosenberg, an expert on sanctions with Center for a New American Security, a Washington-based think-tank, said if oil changes hands and even if it is then put in storage, the buyer would then be violating sanctions.
Summary Source FAQ Feedback Top keywords: oil#1 sanctions#2 Iranian#3 China#4 July#5
Post found in /China and /vzla.
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2019.08.07 11:00 autotldr Gold tops $1 500 as investors seek shelter from gathering storm

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 67%. (I'm a bot)
BY: Bloomberg Gold futures rallied above $1 500 an ounce on sustained demand for the traditional haven as the US-China trade war festers, global growth slows and central banks around the world ease monetary policy.
Gold has been one of the chief beneficiaries of the turmoil in global financial markets as Washington and Beijing spar over trade.
Under the bank's risk case, marked by a further escalation of the trade fight, prices could go as high as $1 600, he said.
Futures traded at $1 498.10 an ounce at 12:08 p.m. in Singapore, gaining for a fourth day.
Miners' shares climbed in Sydney, with Newcrest Mining Ltd. jumping as much as 4.1% while Evolution Mining added as much as 6.4%. Silver, gold's cheaper cousin, also surged.
Mark Mobius said in July prices were poised to top $1 500 as interest rates headed lower, declaring: "I love gold." Billionaire hedge-fund manager Ray Dalio has suggested the market may just be at the start of a period that would be very positive for gold.
Summary Source FAQ Feedback Top keywords: Gold#1 trade#2 much#3 ounce#4 prices#5
Post found in /Economics.
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2019.06.04 18:39 subreddit_stats Subreddit Stats: RedditDayOf posts from 2019-05-01 to 2019-06-03 11:10 PDT

Period: 33.33 days
Submissions Comments
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Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 888 points, 60 submissions: 0and18
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    4. Old Detroit Skyline 1929 Seen from Windsor Ontario Canada (54 points, 0 comments)
    5. Selling Used Panties Online Is Harder Than You Think (47 points, 0 comments)
    6. A Night at the Garden (45 points, 6 comments)
    7. Chicken McNuggets and kangaroo meat. (36 points, 7 comments)
    8. “A World Of Laughter, A World Of Tears”. A very blink Walt Disney Presidency (28 points, 1 comment)
    9. May 18th - Tiny Homes (24 points, 0 comments)
    10. May 9th - Kombucha (23 points, 0 comments)
  2. 446 points, 16 submissions: sbroue
    1. Wee Gee New york 1950s (114 points, 1 comment)
    2. Real-life jungle books – how feral children raised by animals continue to fire the imagination (61 points, 2 comments)
    3. Child actor Jackie Coogan, sidekick of Charlie Chaplin, later TV's Uncle Fester was involved in a Lynching of two men accused of a kidnap/murder (58 points, 2 comments)
    4. "Hummus the Movie" the official trailer (57 points, 1 comment)
    5. Santo & Johnny: Sleep Walk (1959) (42 points, 6 comments)
    6. Marlon Brando sings! - Luck Be a Lady (from 'Guys and Dolls' (1955)) (24 points, 1 comment)
    7. Crash test with and without safety belt (21 points, 4 comments)
    8. Australian Rules Football: best moments of 2018 (17 points, 2 comments)
    9. 1973 Nissan Skyline Nissan Heritage Collection (15 points, 0 comments)
    10. The Lemon Drop Kid (Movie Clip) written by Damon Runyon (13 points, 0 comments)
  3. 285 points, 4 submissions: joelschlosberg
    1. Castor Oyl, the brother of Popeye's love interest Olive Oyl. In his original debut in the comics, Popeye meets Castor before Olive, as shown in this strip. (166 points, 3 comments)
    2. Kermit the Frog's (82 points, 2 comments)
    3. Stephen King's The Plant. In 2000, he posted 6 monthly installments from the still-incomplete tale to see if Web surfers would pay a dollar to read them. (35 points, 3 comments)
    4. Sunclipse, which author Michael Stutz posted on his personal website in 1997. One of the first fictional books to be "free" online, as in "no cost" and/or "permissive copyright access"; Stutz used the GNU GPL since copyleft licenses didn't exist yet for non-software media. (2 points, 0 comments)
  4. 258 points, 2 submissions: 427BananaFish
    1. Shanghai in the ‘90s compared to the skyline twenty years later. (Classic repost) (147 points, 6 comments)
    2. The original POWERTHIRST was uploaded to youtube 12 years ago today (111 points, 2 comments)
  5. 150 points, 3 submissions: graaahh
    1. The Simpsons - Canyonero (91 points, 1 comment)
    2. Chris Haffey reattempts the longest rollerblade grind ever - the 666' rail (52 points, 7 comments)
    3. Mindgame - Words (7 points, 0 comments)
  6. 147 points, 7 submissions: spiket918
    1. Thru-hiking - Wikipedia (38 points, 6 comments)
    2. Anti-cross-dressing laws in the United States (28 points, 0 comments)
    3. Hey, wait, that's not a dummy! (27 points, 1 comment)
    4. Blernsball - lesser known for another 900 years (19 points, 0 comments)
    5. GIFs of the Minneapolis skyline from past to (almost) present (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. Interview with Sia, talks about her song "Chandelier" (14 points, 0 comments)
    7. 16 greatest second-generation athletes of all time (2 points, 2 comments)
  7. 118 points, 2 submissions: Hell_Mel
    1. Teen heartthrob-turned-New Age guru busted for selling unlicensed kombucha in the most LA crime ever (96 points, 5 comments)
    2. The Guns of the South - An Alternate History US Civil War in Which the South Wins...After Being Supplied AK-47's... (22 points, 6 comments)
  8. 105 points, 1 submission: InsertScreenNameHere
    1. I survived a car accident thanks to seatbelts and airbags. I got a crash test dummy symbol tattooed on my chest since I'm living proof they work. (105 points, 15 comments)
  9. 96 points, 1 submission: rainfaint
    1. Eye colors like blue, green, and hazel are largely 'structural' colors arising from the way light is scattered, similar to why the sky is blue. (96 points, 5 comments)
  10. 85 points, 2 submissions: johnabbe
    1. They Might Be Giants - Particle Man (Tiny Tunes video) (76 points, 10 comments)
    2. Nicholas and the Higs - Philip K. Dick (9 points, 0 comments)
  11. 83 points, 2 submissions: Dat_Paki_Browniie
    1. The burning of the Library of Alexandria by Julius Caesar destroyed more than 40,000 scrolls, equivalent to a minimum of 10,000 books. (60 points, 8 comments)
    2. You can have surgery to change the color of your eyes, but there are mixed reviews on the subject. Lasers are used to destroy brown pigment to showcase the underlying blue pigment. (23 points, 7 comments)
  12. 78 points, 1 submission: DeySeeMeLurkin
    1. Father and son hit back to back homers (78 points, 4 comments)
  13. 76 points, 2 submissions: coveredinbeeees
    1. The MN State Fair, or "Great Minnesota Get-Together," runs for 12 days from late August to Labor Day and saw over 2 million visitors in 2018, making it the second largest state fair in the country and the largest by daily attendance. (60 points, 11 comments)
    2. Up the Wolves by the Mountain Goats, which references the legend of Romulus and Remus (16 points, 0 comments)
  14. 73 points, 4 submissions: themanwhosleptin
    1. On May Day, teachers in the Carolinas leave the classroom to rally for higher pay, more school funding (62 points, 1 comment)
    2. The May Pole tradition (6 points, 0 comments)
    3. What Is May Day? (3 points, 0 comments)
    4. How Labor Lost May Day (2 points, 0 comments)
  15. 72 points, 1 submission: Sanlear
    1. Thousands march on May Day, demand better working conditions (72 points, 1 comment)
  16. 70 points, 1 submission: colinvern1994
    1. Sufjan Stevens - "The Man of Metropolis Steals Our Hearts" (2005) (70 points, 9 comments)
  17. 68 points, 1 submission: EtchedKetchum
    1. Log - Ren & Stimpy (68 points, 1 comment)
  18. 65 points, 1 submission: goofballl
    1. Weird Al - Headline News, a parody of Crash Test Dummies. Featuring recaps of the stories of Tonya Harding, Lorena Bobbitt, and the American kid who got caned in Singapore (65 points, 6 comments)
  19. 62 points, 1 submission: BonzosLiver
    1. Bull Durham,1988 movie starring Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon, is based upon the minor-league baseball experiences of writedirector Ron Shelton and depicts the players and fans of the Durham Bulls, a minorleague baseball team in Durham, North Carolina. Ranked #1 sports movie of all time by RT (62 points, 6 comments)
  20. 53 points, 1 submission: musicninja
    1. Skyrim's Thomas the Tank Engine Mod (53 points, 2 comments)
  21. 51 points, 1 submission: Hanginon
    1. Batman & Robin, and Batgirl; Double sidekicks. 22 years on and still apologizing (51 points, 3 comments)
  22. 46 points, 2 submissions: despawnerer
    1. Temple garment aka "mormon underwear" (46 points, 9 comments)
    2. The darker your skin, the darker are your the eyes at birth. Babies of people with light skin color are usually born with blue or gray eyes that change color later, but babies of people with dark skin generally keep their birth eye color. (0 points, 0 comments)
  23. 44 points, 1 submission: Mimshot
    1. Computerphile on Unicode and UTF-8 (44 points, 3 comments)
  24. 42 points, 1 submission: Nesman64
    1. Modlimit - A subreddit dedicated to finding out how many mods a subreddit can have. On Feb 13, they passed /science for number of mods (42 points, 96 comments)
  25. 39 points, 3 submissions: jostler57
    1. “Wild Wacky Action Bike is almost impossible to steer, and it glows in the dark!” (16 points, 0 comments)
    2. Heterochromia Iridum is when one eye has a different color from the other. Often found in Dogs, Cats, and Horses, people also can have this condition, and it affects roughly 200,000 people in the US. Although most cases have issues, some are associated with disease, and need treatment. (13 points, 5 comments)
    3. Rick & Morty is a dark comedy cartoon for sci-fi loving adults, and they’ve made several inter-dimensional TV episodes wherein every line is improvised. Here’s one of the best examples of those commercials. (10 points, 0 comments)
  26. 38 points, 1 submission: jowla
    1. Another creepy short - "Lights Out" (38 points, 5 comments)
  27. 37 points, 1 submission: anax44
    1. I drank a beer at the MN State Fair (37 points, 8 comments)
  28. 37 points, 1 submission: goodoldfreda
    1. Gender equality for crash test dummies, too (37 points, 6 comments)
  29. 37 points, 1 submission: zzzuluz
    1. Ultimate Frisbee) (37 points, 7 comments)
  30. 34 points, 2 submissions: HunterLatherer
    1. Creepiest 1 minute long short film (23 points, 1 comment)
    2. The Flaming Lips - Waiting For Superman (11 points, 2 comments)
  31. 33 points, 1 submission: TheDopeGodfather
    1. The definitive sub for today's topic (33 points, 1 comment)
  32. 33 points, 1 submission: voltronforlife
    1. 3-year-old learns the meaning of "happy tears" (33 points, 7 comments)
  33. 32 points, 1 submission: intangible-tangerine
    1. Only Fools and Horses - Chandelier scene (32 points, 0 comments)
  34. 27 points, 2 submissions: HoovesCarveCraters
    1. Monument to Balto in Central Park, NYC (19 points, 0 comments)
    2. Animals in War Memorial - London. Dedicated to all the animals of all species who have lost their lives in war (8 points, 0 comments)
  35. 23 points, 3 submissions: art-man_2018
    1. The Kinks - (Wish I Could Fly Like) Superman (1979) (15 points, 0 comments)
    2. The Who - Quadrophenia [Full Album Playlist] (1973) (6 points, 1 comment)
    3. Bat-O-Matic (ft. Dan Aykroyd) - Saturday Night Live (1976) (2 points, 0 comments)
  36. 20 points, 2 submissions: JoeAconite
    1. How Did the Pet Rock Fad Start? (11 points, 2 comments)
    2. Big Bill Hell's (9 points, 0 comments)
  37. 20 points, 1 submission: Our-Year
    1. List_of_MythBusters_cast_members#Buster - Buster is a crash test dummy that plays an important role in many experiments by taking the place of a human subject in the more dangerous myth tests. (20 points, 2 comments)
  38. 20 points, 1 submission: turismofan1986
    1. The Incredible Crash Test Dummies - 90's Cartoon (20 points, 1 comment)
  39. 19 points, 1 submission: SwampRabbit
    1. Busting Corset Myths - Foundations Revealed (19 points, 1 comment)
  40. 18 points, 1 submission: ElLechero
    1. One of many statues of Wojtek, a bear officially drafted by Poland during WWII. He carried artillery shells, kept soldiers warm by sleeping next to them. He smoked, drank beer, and marched alongside soldiers, saluting them when greeted. He rose from rank of Private to Corporal during his service. (18 points, 5 comments)
  41. 17 points, 1 submission: eventhorizon07
    1. Spatula City - UHF (17 points, 0 comments)
  42. 16 points, 2 submissions: Flo__Moore
    1. An Explanation of Unicode Character Encoding (11 points, 0 comments)
    2. Crash Test Dummy Costume (5 points, 0 comments)
  43. 16 points, 1 submission: galendil
    1. Hurling! (16 points, 0 comments)
  44. 15 points, 1 submission: HeroVorpal
    1. Wildbow is one of the most prolific web novelists. He’s published at least two chapters a week since 2011 and has yet to miss a day. This is his first and most successful book: Worm. (15 points, 1 comment)
  45. 15 points, 1 submission: rvaen
    1. The SNL Totinos Trilogy (15 points, 8 comments)
  46. 15 points, 1 submission: settemio
    1. Mr. Show - Mayostard / Mustardayonnaise / Mustmayostardayonnaise (15 points, 0 comments)
  47. 12 points, 3 submissions: Matti_Matti_Matti
    1. Mmmm Mmmm Mmmm Mmmm (8 points, 1 comment)
    2. Sydney skyline at sunset (OC) (2 points, 0 comments)
    3. Sydney skyline from South Head (OC) (2 points, 0 comments)
  48. 10 points, 2 submissions: aleagueofmyown
    1. Spin Doctors - Jimmy Olsen's Blues (6 points, 0 comments)
    2. Ramones - Spider-Man (4 points, 1 comment)
  49. 10 points, 2 submissions: anotherkeebler
    1. 5-Second Films challenge to producers: Can you tell an entire story in a movie that is five seconds long? (9 points, 3 comments)
    2. R.E.M. - "Superman" (1 point, 2 comments)
  50. 10 points, 2 submissions: trubbub
    1. Franz Nicolay - The Ballad of Hollis Wadsworth Mason, Jr. (6 points, 1 comment)
    2. The Dukes Of Stratosphear - Brainiac's Daughter (4 points, 0 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Nesman64 (59 points, 47 comments)
  2. 0and18 (57 points, 43 comments)
  3. Hell_Mel (27 points, 9 comments)
  4. rprebel (14 points, 1 comment)
  5. DeaconOrlov (13 points, 2 comments)
  6. YOUREABOT (12 points, 7 comments)
  7. goodoldfreda (12 points, 3 comments)
  8. Matti_Matti_Matti (12 points, 2 comments)
  9. timidwildone (12 points, 2 comments)
  10. anax44 (11 points, 6 comments)
  11. jostler57 (11 points, 3 comments)
  12. parad0xchild (10 points, 3 comments)
  13. DobbyDun (10 points, 1 comment)
  14. Nooooope (10 points, 1 comment)
  15. acarp25 (10 points, 1 comment)
  16. leiladobadoba (10 points, 1 comment)
  17. Dat_Paki_Browniie (9 points, 5 comments)
  18. Langston_huge (9 points, 3 comments)
  19. etherteeth (9 points, 1 comment)
  20. Hanginon (8 points, 1 comment)
  21. InsertScreenNameHere (7 points, 4 comments)
  22. PublicWest (7 points, 2 comments)
  23. lrhoades1 (7 points, 2 comments)
  24. The_Bravinator (7 points, 1 comment)
  25. redcolumbine (7 points, 1 comment)
  26. rvaen (6 points, 5 comments)
  27. spiket918 (6 points, 4 comments)
  28. anotherkeebler (6 points, 3 comments)
  29. SquatsAndIceCream (6 points, 2 comments)
  30. Chrischn89 (6 points, 1 comment)
  31. KurtDunn (6 points, 1 comment)
  32. SirBlakely (6 points, 1 comment)
  33. legendofsteve (6 points, 1 comment)
  34. muideracht (6 points, 1 comment)
  35. tillandsia (6 points, 1 comment)
  36. indigoshift (5 points, 3 comments)
  37. Angoth (5 points, 2 comments)
  38. LeakyFrog (5 points, 2 comments)
  39. PrimoThePro (5 points, 2 comments)
  40. RootbeerFlotilla (5 points, 2 comments)
  41. berusplants (5 points, 2 comments)
  42. Jedibrad (5 points, 1 comment)
  43. Mind_Killer (5 points, 1 comment)
  44. PossiblyAsian (5 points, 1 comment)
  45. Robelius (5 points, 1 comment)
  46. feint_of_heart (5 points, 1 comment)
  47. j33pwrangler (5 points, 1 comment)
  48. lil-quiche (5 points, 1 comment)
  49. miork2056 (5 points, 1 comment)
  50. deltree711 (4 points, 4 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Monument to lab mouse in Novosibirsk, Russia. by 0and18 (177 points, 5 comments)
  2. Castor Oyl, the brother of Popeye's love interest Olive Oyl. In his original debut in the comics, Popeye meets Castor before Olive, as shown in this strip. by joelschlosberg (166 points, 3 comments)
  3. Shanghai in the ‘90s compared to the skyline twenty years later. (Classic repost) by 427BananaFish (147 points, 6 comments)
  4. Wee Gee New york 1950s by sbroue (114 points, 1 comment)
  5. The original POWERTHIRST was uploaded to youtube 12 years ago today by 427BananaFish (111 points, 2 comments)
  6. I survived a car accident thanks to seatbelts and airbags. I got a crash test dummy symbol tattooed on my chest since I'm living proof they work. by InsertScreenNameHere (105 points, 15 comments)
  7. Eye colors like blue, green, and hazel are largely 'structural' colors arising from the way light is scattered, similar to why the sky is blue. by rainfaint (96 points, 5 comments)
  8. Teen heartthrob-turned-New Age guru busted for selling unlicensed kombucha in the most LA crime ever by Hell_Mel (96 points, 5 comments)
  9. The Simpsons - Canyonero by graaahh (91 points, 1 comment)
  10. Kermit the Frog's by joelschlosberg (82 points, 2 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 14 points: rprebel's comment in Wee Gee New york 1950s
  2. 11 points: DeaconOrlov's comment in The burning of the Library of Alexandria by Julius Caesar destroyed more than 40,000 scrolls, equivalent to a minimum of 10,000 books.
  3. 11 points: timidwildone's comment in They Might Be Giants - Particle Man (Tiny Tunes video)
  4. 10 points: DobbyDun's comment in Chicken McNuggets and kangaroo meat.
  5. 10 points: Matti_Matti_Matti's comment in Castor Oyl, the brother of Popeye's love interest Olive Oyl. In his original debut in the comics, Popeye meets Castor before Olive, as shown in this strip.
  6. 10 points: Nooooope's comment in The Guns of the South - An Alternate History US Civil War in Which the South Wins...After Being Supplied AK-47's...
  7. 10 points: acarp25's comment in Teen heartthrob-turned-New Age guru busted for selling unlicensed kombucha in the most LA crime ever
  8. 10 points: leiladobadoba's comment in Monument to lab mouse in Novosibirsk, Russia.
  9. 9 points: etherteeth's comment in Ultimate Frisbee
  10. 8 points: Hanginon's comment in Temple garment aka "mormon underwear"
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2019.06.03 12:40 Diogenes_of_Sparta The Psychiatrist in My Writing Class and His ‘Gift’ of Hate

Rani Neutill recalls a literary workshop in which a white man critiqued her ability to write in “proper” English.
It is day three of the writing workshop. I sit in a small room with a table fit for ten. The chairs, blue and plastic, are uncomfortable. The table, smooth. The walls, buttercream. I cram writing, reading, and workshopping into four hours a day. Each morning a slight wind breaks through the New England summer heat and wafts salt through the air. It reminds me that the ocean is not far away. I am grateful to have five days away from waiting tables and teaching so I can learn and write.
Covered in greens, reds, and orange, I wear tank tops that expose my tattoos, that make eyes follow the lines of my decorated arms. My skin has grown into a deep brown from the sun’s finesse, from the batches of melanin that lay under my flesh, from my mother’s Indian blood.
All my classmates are white.
I have meticulously selected this date, smack in the middle of the week to present my work. I wanted time to get acclimated, to know my fellow classmates, to feel comfortable around them. When I walked into the room on the first day, I felt my difference, my race, my arms marked with color. I knew my story would be different. How questions of racism and immigration might not pertain to the other members of my class. The eight pages I workshop are from the memoir I’ve been writing for three years about my mentally ill Bengali immigrant mother and the way she tragically died. A memoir about the silence around mental illness within South Asian communities. A memoir about the costs of beauty defined by racism, a quintessential Bengali story about the impact of the forces of migration and colonialism.
The teacher is intelligent and kind and has encouraged helpful criticism, beginning with an author’s strengths. She does not like the Iowa Workshop type of annihilating appraisal. Students talk about what they like. Then a fellow workshopper says,
“I guess I’m the only one who hated this piece.”
I recoil.
My skin combusts into tendrils from the force of his statement. My back sharpens. Eyes wide, I turn towards this man. I am thankful there is a student between us so I don’t have to be near his translucent skin, his bald head shimmering under the fluorescent lights. Sweat beading on his brow. His long grey and red beard, his attempt to look distinct. His small silver earrings, his attempt to look edgy.
The class takes a quick breath, exhaling after two Mississippi seconds. It is a pause and silence that registers what was said. That impenetrable word, hate.
He continues.
“I found myself furiously crossing things out and correcting grammar, fixing sentences and wondering when this writer learned to speak English.”
I wonder if he has British blood. I was a professor of postcolonial literature for sixteen years. I am familiar with the white man’s interrogation of colonized peoples’ ability to speak English. I read and taught Freud and Lacan to analyze the white man’s words; Kipling, Macaulay, EM Forster all come to mind.
I am livid. I was born in the United States. English is my first language and I speak it fluently, but am embarrassed because my relationship with the language is fraught. My mother’s English was fractured. Her accent muddled white people’s perception of her. She tried hard to rid herself of that accent, to sound like a “real” American. As she grew older, her Indian accent crept back in and her English became broken.
In the United States, when I refused to speak her first language, my mother chased me around the house, wooden spoon in hand. I locked the door and hid under my bed, the darkness soothing me, coaxing me into invisibility.
“I don’t want to speak Bengali!” I cried.
“It is my language. You must learn it!” she always screamed back.
Phrases became second nature and fell from my mouth with ease. Relatives in Calcutta always remarked, praising my mother,
“Baah! Rani toh khub bhalo Bangla bolte pare?”
My mother beamed with pride, proud that her American daughter was learning about her culture and adopting her native tongue. But she also needed to sound like an “American,” so no one would question where she belonged. They always did.
My mother flew me across the world to visit her mother, my Dida, each year. My Dida did not speak English. When she tried, I had to stitch up the meaning between Bengali and English words, suturing them into something comprehensive. At times I missed months of school, and with them, the lessons on subject-verb agreement, on proper comma usage. My writing became fragmented. After my white father’s death, my mother lived off his life insurance, traveling around the world. When we went to places like Hong Kong and Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia, people always asked her, “Where are you from?”
“Planet earth!” she’d respond.
I can still feel my mother’s hand wrapped tightly around my wrist as she pulled me through airports where I learned the names of whiskeys, vodkas, perfumes, and lipsticks in duty-free shops that were too brightly lit. Then I spent hours in uncomfortable airport lounge chairs, waiting to reach whatever temporary destination my mother had designed for us.
My mind falls back to my present reality and the man’s critique of my language. I bite my tongue and concentrate on the pain so I don’t cry. After all, I need to learn what’s wrong with my work for it to grow. But this man’s interrogation of my ability to write in English burns like the orange embers on the tip of a cigarette. I pray it quickly turns to ash.
No one intervenes to criticize his racist remarks. I know they notice the word hate from how the room loses its breath. But when I bring it up later, people say, “I didn’t notice he said that.” Hate is where they stopped listening because it does not pertain to them. They do not recognize how it festers with paternalistic condemnation of my ability to communicate in a language he believes he is master of. They do not register the ways his comments about my English are far worse than the word hate.
This man is a psychiatrist. He speaks of Freud and analysis. He is the dean of a prestigious medical school. He notes that many of the applicants are now Chinese and how hard it is for him to understand their broken English. As he says these things, the spittle of disdain forms around the corners of his mouth. He is assertive. Cocky. He continues his review of my pages, looks over at me, challenges me to look him directly in the eye. I am not up for the confrontation.
“Part of loving someone is telling them what you hate,” he says. “It is a gift of kindness.”
I think, How can you love me when you don’t even know me? I begin to wonder if he thinks of me when he is alone in a room, left with his anatomy.
Bile rises up my throat and reaches the tip of my tongue.
I note the history in his statement. How loving relates to hate. How hate relates to loving. When the British colonized India they believed they were saviors, rational beings who would educate the natives and give them real language, not babbling tongues. The British praised themselves for giving Indians the written word, saving them from the primitiveness of oral traditions. Desire for something Other festered within the British as they condemned the natives and their savage ways, saving Indian women from Indian men, giving Indians what they believed was the ultimate gift, the English language. I wonder if this is what the psychiatrist feels, the hubris of being a gift giver and savior, when he turns his head towards me and says, “I love you. I hate you, too.”
How much power he wields as he psychoanalyzes my words.
Later, I speak with the teacher. She doesn’t recall his remarks about my English but she does remember the use of the word hate. I explain to her how racist his assertions were, how wrong, but I flounder about. I feel shame, pettiness for not ignoring him and moving forward, and yet I know that I must mention the simmering cinders of his words now inside me. She is kind and asks, “How can I do better?”
I am grateful but have no answer.
That night I examine the man’s grammatical corrections and his marginal comments. I take in how literal he is. How very clinical and clean. How very dry. Anger sears in my throat. I stare at his edits for what seems like hours until I begin to rip the pages apart. First horizontally and then diagonally then vertically, every which way I can. I wish I had a lighter, could set fire to the edges and watch the curl of the burn, watch it decimate, incinerate his response to my sentences, my vowels and consonants. Instead, I take the pieces of paper and shove them into the small trashcan next to the kitchen sink. I push them down to the bottom amidst banana peels and coffee grounds. My hands now sticky and stubbled with trashy remains of his analysis. I immediately wash my hands, not bothering to dry them. I let the water drip off of me. I do not want any dry and clean remains of his analysis.
I think of Viet Nguyen’s OpEd in the New York Times about the place for people of color in the traditional Iowa Writing Workshop. The push towards showing, not telling. Nguyen notes this drive, how it does not recognize that people of color must tell their history, a history that was thrust upon them. They do not have the privilege of only showing, not telling. I think of the psychiatrist. I feel I must educate this man and make him confront his racism. I email the OpEd to the entire class. No one responds but him. His email is only to me. He tries to sound enlightened.
“I hope,” he writes, “it calls us to expand the methodology to be more inclusive.”
Does he remember his statements, his declarations about my ability to speak English? Why am I the only person he emails? Why was my work the only work he loved and hated? What do I provoke in him? What kind of love and hate?
The next evening students are invited to read a single page of their work to an audience. I muster up the courage to get on the stage amongst people who have published books and won prizes, so much more accomplished than me, I shake.
I walk to the podium with insecurity and fear. The psychiatrist is in the audience. I fix my gaze away from him and read about my mother, the harrowing way she died.
After, a woman approaches me and thanks me for my work. She tells me how she cried in response, how I evoked sadness and uncontrollable emotions. As I linger with her, the psychiatrist hovers nearby. I feel his loitering, his tall, thin frame looming towards me. The heat of his presence, his preoccupation with me and my work. I do not want him near me. I draw out my conversation to avoid his impending approach. Still, he waits.
When the woman leaves, he steps toward me to tell me what a good job I have done, as if his approval seals my talent. He is gracing me with his knowledge, his love that I vehemently want to destroy.
“I just wanted to tell you that you did an incredible job reading, really moving,” he says.
“Thank you, thanks, thanks,” I reply.
My skin tightens in response to his proximity. I hide my hatred and anger, uttering forced pleasantries.
“It was a great experience to read my work,” I nervously say. “I am glad you enjoyed it. It is hard for me to read my work amongst so many accomplished people.”
I am embarrassed by my admission, that I have confessed my insecurities. I walk away.
Months go by. An essay I have written is published. I am proud of this piece. It has taken months to revise. The essay is about my Dida and the performance of gender. It is about the romance novels I loved as a child and a moment when my Dida tells me I am cursed with sexiness. It is about how sexiness does not equal love. I think of the psychiatrist. I feel the need to send him the essay to illustrate my success. I do not think about how my essay is about feminism, but also about desirability. Perhaps in the layers of my unconscious I realize that I am desirable to this man, but not in the ways I want to be. I begin to psychoanalyze him. His hovering and his challenging look, his email to me, his love and hate and kindness. How much does hate relate to sex and the desire to control? They are inextricable. I know he knows this. He did, after all, cite Freud. I, after all, know Freud’s work. I think, for him, I am powerful in my sexuality, but he does not see the prowess of my words. I want to be wanted in all the ways he does not want me: my writing and the stories I narrate and create. I want to know that he believes I can create sound, grammatically correct sentences.
I email the entire class to tell them my good news. He replies all to my messages and announces to me, to the class:
“It’s wonderful to read a fully realized piece of yours, abrim with intriguing crosscurrents of pathos, edginess, and — yes — sexiness.”
I ponder his statement. The words, “fully realized,” “intriguing,” “sexiness” and “abrim.” I psychoanalyze his words and think of how for him I am intriguing. I wonder what he means by abrim. I know that “realized” means understandable, that “fully realized” means finally accomplished, that I have finally learned how to speak and write in fluent English. How it pertains to my ability to write clearly, not broken. His commentary is laced with paternalism and condescension. It is spiked with hate and the repulsive natures of his probable desires. It undermines me. He probably does not register this. I can psychoanalyze him, but he cannot psychoanalyze himself. Such is a white man’s privilege.
I do not respond.
More months go by. I hope I have moved on from the psychiatrist’s scathing critique of my language. I hope I have proven my ability to write a “fully realized” story, a grammatically correct sentence. But one night, I have a dream that I straddle the psychiatrist while he sits in a blue vinyl dentist chair, probes, excavators, and forceps around. I recall the time I had a tooth extracted. The procedure took over two hours. The dentist used a vial of Novocain to numb the left side of my mouth. I still felt a piercing pain whenever he pulled. I told him this, but he did not believe me. Not until fat wet tears mixed with black mascara ran down my face. The dentist administered three more vials but I still felt a sharp spasm when he tried to extract the infected tooth. He had to saw it in half and remove it in tiny pieces. In my dream, as I sit on top of the psychiatrist, a bright white glare illuminates his face from the burning lights above. It exposes every wrinkle that crawls through his forehead and around his eyes. I grab his face and press my fingers into his jaw. He winces with pain. It makes me happy. I furiously shake his head, as if to break his neck, his wrinkly skin on my fingertips, the coarseness of his beard. The glint of his silver earrings. Bile rises up into my throat, travels all the way to the tip of my tongue, once again. I want to vomit all over his face. Instead, I wake and touch my face, explore its heat, how it’s scorched with hatred, red and hot. I wonder if this means I love him, want him. I know it does not.
Rani Neutill’s work has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, Catapult, Hobart, Redivider and she has work forthcoming in The Rumpus. She is working on a memoir about fractured identity and her relationship with her mentally ill Bengali immigrant mother.
submitted by Diogenes_of_Sparta to GGdiscussion [link] [comments]


2019.05.05 03:14 dashrandom Always remember what you stand for

After seeing some worrying posts here regarding a certain Facebook page, just a reminder that using censorship to fight censorship or hate to fight hate is not the way to go. Fighting fire with fire makes you an arsonist too.
If you want to win and still stick to your principles, you always need to be the bigger person. Bigger heart, bigger mind. If you want rights, those rights cannot be solely exclusive to you, you need to champion them for everyone, even your enemies.
The only difference between an extremist on the left and an extremist on the right isn't really their beliefs, but the way they choose to rationalize their actions.
Edit: seeing the replies I can only say one thing, we are fucking doomed as a nation if this is how we proceed to grow.
I understand that LGBT camp is asking for right to marriage and I support it, or at least something like PACS (civil union) that exists in France. But at the same time, if you value freedom of speech and action, you can't be demanding that one Facebook group is shut down. Hateful speech is still free speech.
Singapore government tried to ban a specific bike forum, did that work? No. Censorship never achieves anything. You only allow people stuck in their own mindsets to continue to fester and breed by creating perceived injustices against them. You can only change people's beliefs with open conversation and love. Isn't that what pink dot is about? Ya'll a bunch of fucking hypocrites if you support Pink Dot and don't want to engage the other side with the same principles you believe in.
Violence only begets violence. Hate only begets hate. This is a teaching from a fake religion btw.
submitted by dashrandom to singapore [link] [comments]


2019.03.19 08:50 Lennythetrp I'm at day 31 - What I've learned

Overall this has been the rockiest journey I've ever embarked on. I moved to Singapore back in October, and had to stop smoking weed. That of itself was brutal. I quit smoking cigarettes in November. And I quit drinking Feb 18 of this year (2019).
Here's the short list:
  1. You will go crazy. Guaranteed. Take it easy during the first two weeks. Don't plan anything. Just go autopilot at your job, or take some time off and let everything balance.
  2. Drink chamomile tea, water, soda, whatever it takes to get your mind off your regular booze habit. I'd always drink beer at night and wine on Fridays/weekends - but now I just drink chamomile tea and lots of water.
  3. Exercise helps. I've gotten into swimming, and picked up my old soccer habit again. I also enjoy socializing during soccer ,which I missed a lot of.
  4. Don't be afraid to go out. I've been out a few times with my coworkers and alcohol is a staple at these outings. I just drink water or juice and ignore any jabs from others. Some people actually are astonished that you cannot drink, and admire the courage you have. I'm not going to stop socializing just because I'm not drinking afterall.
  5. Take care of yourself. It's normal to eat more sugar but after a while it also takes a toll on you, so just keep in mind your long term goals but at the same time don't put a lot of pressure on yourself to eat a super clean healthy diet. Everything comes in due time.
  6. Give yourself credit where it's due. We're just human beings, not superbeings. We have to deal with a lot in our lives and alcohol overcomplicated things while making it appear that it was helping. In my case it was a huge setback for me, the health effects alone messed me up and made me less productive, anxious, etc. But ow that I'm sober life hits me in waves, I have my good days and bad. Todays definitely a good day. What I find helps balance the bad days into good days is music, exercise, chamomile tea and generally taking it easy.
  7. Being in control is awesome. I think back to all the fucked up things that have happened to me in the past and I realize in all of these experiences, alcohol is a common denominator. I wonder if I had quit drinking earlier if I Would've been able to take care of myself better and avoid certain scenarios or react in a more genuine way instead of letting things fester. But regardless, I look forward to the future and specifically being in control in a sober state of mind.
Kind of a long rant here but I hope it helps others who are in the same position as me or that I was in. Quitting sucks at first, but in the long run I feel like it unlocks some superpowers of self-preservation and determination to live a healthy life and not require anything to numb or enhance our senses. Life is too short to get fucked up on rotten fruit juice.
submitted by Lennythetrp to stopdrinking [link] [comments]


2019.03.10 11:43 alstontowers Hackers and the Battle Pass

Talk with your wallet.
I play on Asian servers mostly as I'm an ex-pat living in Vietnam. Hong Kong was the ideal server for me as it ran at a consistent sub-30 ping. 0 packet loss.
First week of the game was amazing. Sunk 100 hours into it which is something I haven't done in a game for years.
I was ready to buy packs and grin and bear whatever price EA stuck on the Battle Pass, because holy shit this was a cool game.
Then the hackers arrived.
I went to the Singapore servers and played there. 80-90 ping, mild packet loss but not enough to harm the gameplay.
The game was okay for a few days.
Then hackers.
Chinese spam bots with links to chat rooms and websites for buying hacks. Blatant wallhack and aimbot.
Started not caring about winning the game and just tried to get into some fun gunfights.
But it has become unbearable.
I even moved to Oregon servers - 150 ping, fair bit of packet loss. Beyond the wacky ping I've even started coming across hackers there as well.
For those out there who deny the scale of the hacking issue, you are talking out of your ass. This issue will grow exponentially unless EA and Respawn take drastic measures to fix this now.
I know that Respawn have replied to some of the problems with hackers already. But I still see too many people saying the issue is blown out of proportion.
We need to make this a BIG issue, otherwise the game will die like others before it.
TLDR: Don't buy the Battle Pass until this hacking problem is fixed. EA needs to understand that allowing these hackers to fester will break the game.
submitted by alstontowers to apexlegends [link] [comments]


2019.02.19 00:35 Sapiensssssss Sick of Hong Kongers treating Mainland Mandarin Speakers like Crap

TL;DR : Hong Kongers are hypocrites who possess a personality that is no different from the Mainland Chinese they hold in disdain and contempt. Manners merely account for what is the case on a behavioural level, but in mind and spirit, Hong Kongers love face, status, and money just like any other Chinese.
I must say that Hong Kongers are bullies who channel their hatred covertly with passive aggression and psychological manipulation, especially towards non-Cantonese speaking Asians. They will take any means necessary to conceal their hatred and straight-up lie to your face if you confront them directly about whether or not they have a problem with you. To your face, they will praise and flatter you to gain your trust, but in their minds I have found that they hold the intent to ruthlessly exploit that trust once it has been obtained, all the while taking every opportunity to stab you in the back without hesitation.
What I find to be especially revulsive is their irrational animosity towards mainlanders. I feel like Hong Kong has journalists on patrol 24/7 stalking mainlanders, waiting to pounce at even the slightest annoyance caused by mainlanders (suitcases blocking the way). While I do admit that there are mainlanders who lack manners and sometimes exhibit uncivil behaviour, that is not unique to mainland Chinese as this occurs amongst people of the countryside, American tourists, and in other cosmopolitan cities such as San Francisco or Paris. This reflects a gross double standard where if an American was caught eating on the subway, a hong konger would politely notify the American that eating is not allowed, whereas if it were a Mainland Chinese, the surrounding hong kongers would yell, cause a scene and post it on social media. This leads to the conclusion that Hong Kongers despise mainlanders just because they are from the mainland, and not because of their ignorance of the rules and social customs.
Why do these hong kongers who indulge in hypocrisy harbour such a deep-seated hatred for Mainland Chinese? It all has to do with Britain's separation of Hong Kong from the Mainland. The possible reasons that I can think of are:
1) The liberal capitalism implemented by the British brought about economic prosperity for Hong Kong while the Mainland languished in poverty under Communist rule. This led Hong Kongers to view their mainland brethren with disdain. Now the roles are reversed as rich mainland Chinese tourists "swarm Hong Kong like locusts", as Hong Kongers would call them. Hong Kongers are just jealous and would only be content if Mainlanders remained as poor as they used to be.
2) Hong Kongers were taught manners under British administration, whereas the majority of Mainlanders were not. So now, Hong Kongers look down on Mainland Chinese for being uncouth, in the same way the British look down on Americans. Like I have mentioned before, this is a gross double standard as the white-worship in Hong Kong is palpable. Whites receive higher pay, appointed managerial positions, and treated with respect just because they are white (refer back to the eating on the subway example).
3) The Communist Party's clamp down on Hong Kong citizens' fundamental rights and liberties previously granted by the British has been a main cause of Hong Konger's resentment of the Mainland. Now for some reason, this resentment of China's ruling political party has become associated with mandarin, which isn't even the mother tongue of a lot of mainlanders since they speak a dialect in the region in which they grew up. Mandarin is the de facto lingua franca of China, just like how English is in the UK, where gaelic, welsh, and scots are spoken. So Hong Kongers hate the language of the Communist Party of China for taking away what the British gave them, fair enough, but what is irrational is their pride of Cantonese, a dialect that is also spoken in China's Guangdong province. What we have here is Hong Konger's ungratefulness of everything that Great Britain gave them. After 150 YEARS of British rule, hong kongers continue to speak cantonese as their mother tongue and speak English at a level that is worse than many mainland immigrants in America. On the other hand, Singapore, another British colony in Asia, is inhabited by native citizens of an asian ethnicity who speak english as their first language.
I would say their love and pride of Cantonese as their mother tongue is a greater factor contributing to their hatred of mandarin and the mainland, since the "mandarin-speaking locusts" relentlessly consume Hong Kong's resources. Shenzhen is a cantonese speaking city that is literally right across the hong kong border, and I assure you if someone from Shenzhen tries hard enough to imitate a hong konger, he could easily pretend to be one of them. It is incredibly obvious that Hong Kongers are just upset that cantonese is on the verge of extinction as mandarin increasingly gains economic and political clout. FFS, the reason why hong kong was so prosperous in the first place was due to British rule, not Cantonese, which is also the mother tongue of MAINLAND CHINESE IN GUANGDONG. Now they continuously protest for the rights and freedoms that Great Britain gave them, acting like a bunch of hypocrites as they still speak a CHINESE DIALECT amongst themselves in what it seems like an attempt at linguistic preservation.
Now stop with this Hong Kong is not China nonsense as you keep violating the principles you have set-up for yourselves in a show of hypocrisy that is far beneath the uncivil mannerisms of mainlanders. Britain gave you liberty, and what have Hong Kongers done with that liberty? Continue to act Chinese by speaking Cantonese and adhering to Chinese culture whilst indulging in Great Britain's rule of law, expectations of polite conduct, and the economic successes of capitalism. Now that Britain has handed over Hong Kong back to China, Hong Kongers beg and cry for independence since reunification with Britain seems no longer possible, just so they can keep speaking a CHINESE DIALECT, write to each other in CHINESE CHARACTERS (the Cantonese language has a few special characters, but aside from that their sentences are no different from Mandarin), and govern themselves just like how any person in Guangdong province would.
Now what does this mean? It means that Hong Kongers are just as Chinese as their mainland counterparts from a personality standpoint. They act with manners for the sole purpose of maintaining their "face" and nothing else, because they would not dare to act as uncivilized as their mainland brethren for the fear of losing face. Similarly, the greed and money worship in China is more or less the same in Hong Kong. Having already covered personality, on a sociological level, hong kongers act with a collectivistic mindset and there is an expectation to unquestionably defer to authority just like in China.
This might be the case like anywhere else where you are a foreigner, but the hong kongers I have encountered show blatant favouritism towards their fellow cantonese speakers, as the last Hong Kong boss I had would frequently give his cantonese-speaking staff more responsibility, more hours, and more pay raise. Despite Hong Kong having been a British colony for a good number of years, the english spoken by Hong Kongers is not bona fide to say the least. It sounds broken, fragmented, and has a very peculiar "Chinese style" to it, which is probably due to the fact that they think in Cantonese initially, and then translate into English.
Ultimately, the conclusion to be had here is that Hong Kongers are nothing more than a Cantonese breed of Chinese that had enjoyed the luxuries of British rule while their Cantonese brethren in Guangdong and other mainlanders suffered. Now they cry, moan and wallow in their collective self-pity as they are no longer pampered by the British, letting their feelings of envy towards mainland Chinese fester as they indulge in the schadenfreude of causing mainland Chinese to lose face through public shaming.
TL;DR : Hong Kongers are hypocrites who possess a personality that is no different from the Mainland Chinese they hold in disdain and contempt. Manners merely account for what is the case on a behavioural level, but in mind and spirit, Hong Kongers love face, status, and money just like any other Chinese.
submitted by Sapiensssssss to offmychest [link] [comments]


2019.02.19 00:13 Sapiensssssss Sick of Hong Kongers treating Mainland Mandarin Speakers like crap

TL;DR : Hong Kongers are hypocrites who possess a personality that is no different from the Mainland Chinese they hold in disdain and contempt. Manners merely account for what is the case on a behavioural level, but in mind and spirit, Hong Kongers love face, status, and money just like any other Chinese.
I must say that Hong Kongers are bullies who channel their hatred covertly with passive aggression and psychological manipulation, especially towards non-Cantonese speaking Asians. They will take any means necessary to conceal their hatred and straight-up lie to your face if you confront them directly about whether or not they have a problem with you. To your face, they will praise and flatter you to gain your trust, but in their minds I have found that they hold the intent to ruthlessly exploit that trust once it has been obtained, all the while taking every opportunity to stab you in the back without hesitation.
What I find to be especially revulsive is their irrational animosity towards mainlanders. I feel like Hong Kong has journalists on patrol 24/7 stalking mainlanders, waiting to pounce at even the slightest annoyance caused by mainlanders (suitcases blocking the way). While I do admit that there are mainlanders who lack manners and sometimes exhibit uncivil behaviour, that is not unique to mainland Chinese as this occurs amongst people of the countryside, American tourists, and in other cosmopolitan cities such as San Francisco or Paris. This reflects a gross double standard where if an American was caught eating on the subway, a hong konger would politely notify the American that eating is not allowed, whereas if it were a Mainland Chinese, the surrounding hong kongers would yell, cause a scene and post it on social media. This leads to the conclusion that Hong Kongers despise mainlanders just because they are from the mainland, and not because of their ignorance of the rules and social customs.
Why do these hong kongers who indulge in hypocrisy harbour such a deep-seated hatred for Mainland Chinese? It all has to do with Britain's separation of Hong Kong from the Mainland. The possible reasons that I can think of are:
1) The liberal capitalism implemented by the British brought about economic prosperity for Hong Kong while the Mainland languished in poverty under Communist rule. This led Hong Kongers to view their mainland brethren with disdain. Now the roles are reversed as rich mainland Chinese tourists "swarm Hong Kong like locusts", as Hong Kongers would call them. Hong Kongers are just jealous and would only be content if Mainlanders remained as poor as they used to be.
2) Hong Kongers were taught manners under British administration, whereas the majority of Mainlanders were not. So now, Hong Kongers look down on Mainland Chinese for being uncouth, in the same way the British look down on Americans. Like I have mentioned before, this is a gross double standard as the white-worship in Hong Kong is palpable. Whites receive higher pay, appointed managerial positions, and treated with respect just because they are white (refer back to the eating on the subway example).
3) The Communist Party's clamp down on Hong Kong citizens' fundamental rights and liberties previously granted by the British has been a main cause of Hong Konger's resentment of the Mainland. Now for some reason, this resentment of China's ruling political party has become associated with mandarin, which isn't even the mother tongue of a lot of mainlanders since they speak a dialect in the region in which they grew up. Mandarin is the de facto lingua franca of China, just like how English is in the UK, where gaelic, welsh, and scots are spoken. So Hong Kongers hate the language of the Communist Party of China for taking away what the British gave them, fair enough, but what is irrational is their pride of Cantonese, a dialect that is also spoken in China's Guangdong province.
What we have here is Hong Konger's ungratefulness of everything that Great Britain gave them. After 150 YEARS of British rule, hong kongers continue to speak cantonese as their mother tongue and speak English at a level that is worse than many mainland immigrants in America. On the other hand, Singapore, another British colony in Asia, is inhabited by native citizens of an asian ethnicity who speak english as their first language. I would say their love and pride of Cantonese as their mother tongue is a greater factor contributing to their hatred of mandarin and the mainland, since the "mandarin-speaking locusts" relentlessly consume Hong Kong's resources. Shenzhen is a cantonese speaking city that is literally right across the hong kong border, and I assure you if someone from Shenzhen tries hard enough to imitate a hong konger, he could easily pretend to be one of them. It is incredibly obvious that Hong Kongers are just upset that cantonese is on the verge of extinction as mandarin increasingly gains economic and political clout.
FFS, the reason why hong kong was so prosperous in the first place was due to British rule, not Cantonese, which is also the mother tongue of MAINLAND CHINESE IN GUANGDONG. Now they continuously protest for the rights and freedoms that Great Britain gave them, acting like a bunch of hypocrites as they still speak a CHINESE DIALECT amongst themselves in what it seems like an attempt at linguistic preservation.
Now stop with this Hong Kong is not China nonsense as you keep violating the principles you have set-up for yourselves in a show of hypocrisy that is far beneath the uncivil mannerisms of mainlanders. Britain gave you liberty, and what have Hong Kongers done with that liberty? Continue to act Chinese by speaking Cantonese and adhering to Chinese culture whilst indulging in Great Britain's rule of law, expectations of polite conduct, and the economic successes of capitalism. Now that Britain has handed over Hong Kong back to China, Hong Kongers beg and cry for independence since reunification with Britain seems no longer possible, just so they can keep speaking a CHINESE DIALECT, write to each other in CHINESE CHARACTERS (the Cantonese language has a few special characters, but aside from that their sentences are no different from Mandarin), and govern themselves just like how any person in Guangdong province would.
Now what does this mean? It means that Hong Kongers are just as Chinese as their mainland counterparts from a personality standpoint. They act with manners for the sole purpose of maintaining their "face" and nothing else, because they would not dare to act as uncivilized as their mainland brethren for the fear of losing face. Similarly, the greed and money worship in China is more or less the same in Hong Kong. Having already covered personality, on a sociological level, hong kongers act with a collectivistic mindset and there is an expectation to unquestionably defer to authority just like in China. This might be the case like anywhere else where you are a foreigner, but the hong kongers I have encountered show blatant favouritism towards their fellow cantonese speakers, as the last Hong Kong boss I had would frequently give his cantonese-speaking staff more responsibility, more hours, and more pay raise.
Despite Hong Kong having been a British colony for a good number of years, the english spoken by Hong Kongers is not bona fide to say the least. It sounds broken, fragmented, and has a very peculiar "Chinese style" to it, which is probably due to the fact that they think in Cantonese initially, and then translate into English. Ultimately, the conclusion to be had here is that Hong Kongers are nothing more than a Cantonese breed of Chinese that had enjoyed the luxuries of British rule while their Cantonese brethren in Guangdong and other mainlanders suffered. Now they cry, moan and wallow in their collective self-pity as they are no longer pampered by the British, letting their feelings of envy towards mainland Chinese fester as they indulge in the schadenfreude of causing mainland Chinese to lose face through public shaming.
TL;DR : Hong Kongers are hypocrites who possess a personality that is no different from the Mainland Chinese they hold in disdain and contempt. Manners merely account for what is the case on a behavioural level, but in mind and spirit, Hong Kongers love face, status, and money just like any other Chinese.
submitted by Sapiensssssss to China [link] [comments]


2018.09.25 16:10 youcalyptusplatypus Death of a 3 Year SR - Reflections & Realizations

I just got out of a long term SR where we were together for 3 years. We met when I was 21 and he was 53. It started off gradually, then developed deeper and deeper, and got to the point where we fell for each other.
Our biggest mistake was not doing regular check-ins with each other about where we and our SR was at, and not being transparent enough with the situation.
There were also other things, like myself evolving as an individual over the years with changing circumstances (transitioned from college, moved out, trying to pay all my bills and student loans and also build more of a savings cushion) but not being forthcoming and outright asking for more support and him wanting exclusivity but not offering additional support.
I never explicitly asked for more money, but he also knew about my financial stressors and was definitely in a position to help me up.
I found him so attractive all around - Cambridge and Harvard educated, cultured, emphatic, athletic, tall, handsome, chivalrous, good natured, and kind.
He would always tell me how much he adored me, how much I meant to him, how beautiful I was, and how happy I made him.
I did all I could to be the best SB ever - I always showed up and never cancelled, I scheduled my plans around his timing so I could accommodate our SR, I put in a lot of effort to always look good. If I saw something he liked I would pick it up for him, I always made sure to be my best self no matter what (I’ll always remember him being on the phone taking a very important business call from Finland while I was going down on him one day, and the both of us laughing breathlessly together about it after sex).
I liked him very much as well, but was confused that he was keeping me on a $500ppm (we usually saw each once a week) and the same ppm throughout the entire arrangement even when we had been together for so long. It also put me at a disadvantage that he wanted me to be exclusive with him while he would go on business trips every quarter of the year (so four trips a year) and be gone for 1-2 months each trip. He provided no support while he was gone.
(Not that he wasn’t in a position to provide more. He had businesses around the world and properties in the US, London, Hong Kong, and Singapore. I found his name listed in the Panama Papers. He owned a Porsche and Audi and picked up Rolexes like candy.)
We should have talked things through and also discussed together how to navigate our circumstances which had evolved over time.
During the last year we were together it really did feel like a conventional relationship where we were doing coupley stuff like cooking, grabbing coffee, doing grocery runs, discovering hidden food places like cute little mom-and-pop joints, going on drives, date nights, netflixing and cuddling, talking about our private lives (work, family, friends, our past, etc), travelling together. I’ll always be thankful for the fine dining etiquette he imparted to me (cutlery placed at a 5 o’clock angle across your plate when done, throw the wine to the back of your mouth and let it gradually come forward to the tip of your tougue).
He got very upset that I still wanted to see other people because (in his words), he was “doing so much and trying so hard” by putting in a lot of effort and time into our SR (planning our dates, spending more time just to hang out with me, picking up sweet gifts now and then). He also declared exclusivity to me.
Yet he was still legally wed to his wife (they were separated but not divorced) and had a young teenage kid so where could we ultimately have gone? (I definitely didn’t want to cause any issues for him or his family just so that I could have him for myself either.)
What was left unsaid festered and eventually brought upon the death of our SR, but despite it all I am still thankful for his presence in my life and for the time we had together.
And now it is time to fully close this chapter of my life I had with him, and move on and up.
submitted by youcalyptusplatypus to sugarlifestyleforum [link] [comments]


2018.08.23 22:00 jst4reddit A Monyet Rants: The "I Miss The Days of P Ramlee" Has To Stop

Hello again, recently I saw a comment that inspired me with the same feelings of rage, similar as to when I saw iFlix's absolutely disgusting Cupid Co.
People who miss the days of P Ramlee.
Like, I get it. His movies are amazing stuff. I personally love to death Tiga Abdul. But goddamn would I hate if we were back to the 50s or 60s for Malaysian filmmaking.
We are currently blessed to live with some of the best Malaysian filmmakers to have made Malaysian films, and all people can do is say "hurr hurr P Ramlee movies were the bomb why can't we make them like they used to".
Wtf? Because y'all don't watch them thats why! We live in the day and age where DESPITE nobody supporting goddamn shit these filmmakers are passionate enough to CONTINUE making films that nobody appreciates. Hell I used to wander on sets just to even glimpse at these goddamn heroes and creep by the corner just in absolute wonder.
Intro
I still remember when I was a calefare on Ming Jin's Mamak Cupcake, I stuck around so long just for a chance to talk with some of the crew. I remember shaking just being able to shake Shaheizy Sam's hand. I remember absolute excitement when I grew up and entered the industry to be actually working side by side with Chun, the DOP. I remember bumping into Ming Jin the other day at the hawker center, and ecstatically running to him to say hi and his confused expression.
I still remember meeting U-Wei, the only Malaysian director (if I recall correctly) to have his work enter into Cannes' Un Certain Regard. He told me his war stories and I remember just feeling absolutely honored to have met such an individual. I remember meeting Khairil M Bahar at a conference and sharing some loves about cinema. I remember shaking meeting Chiu and talking about his work with WooHoo! before the Journey, and meeting the EP of Astro Shaw (I think), Gayatri.
Of course, none of them would remember me as a calefare, but I remember thinking, "what a time to be alive."
Rant
Then you get really really really dumb and misguided comments like Malaysia used to have better films. What on Earth are you talking about bro? Can anyone name another director during the 50's and 60's? I sure as hell can't, and I feel absolutely distraught knowing that I can't.
What are we trying to do? Do we need to go back to the stone ages of film production for Malaysians to give enough of a fuck to see local movies? Did we forget that P Ramlee actually lost a lot of the impetus to do his best work when he came to Malaysia to make movies? Guys, he died penniless when we chose to see him as a hack fraud at the time. He had his greatest success in Singapore under Shaw, and when he came down he was let down by Malaysians for lack of support and expertise. We love to mock ourselves, and the consequences are dire.
Look, you wanna know why films like Gangster Celop, Wawa Semput, Abang Long Fadil 2 see the light of day? Because thats what Malaysians want to see. Why else would people like David Teo gain so much clout for making so much schlock? Malaysians have voted with their wallets and good films lost. The battle was lost quite long ago and it seems audiences have voted to continue watching absolute garbage. Shit people like Teo are living in mansions while our industry festers with dog shit.
Malaysian producers and directors are generally intelligent and well versed in cinematic language. They know what they are doing. They also understand that nobody wants to go see a good Malaysian film, they just want to see cerita gangster, cerita romance, cerita hantu dan cerita hantu komedi.
Conclusion
Don't get me wrong. I'm not claiming to be some all knowing paragon of local movie knowledge. I know nothing. But I do understand basic business, and it seems like bad business to make something no one wants to see. It would take an extreme amount of passion or belief to do something as outrageous as that and we live in such a time where filmmaking is at its most accessible, but not watchable for some strange fucking reason.
There is no discussion on this. If you do not support good Malaysian films, what incentive do good Malaysian filmmakers have in making such? Go see Hantu Kak Limah. It's great stuff. Mamat Khalid has outdone himself in crafting his very own MCU (Mamat's Cinematic Universe) and I can't speak to a Malaysian English speaker who actually knows his fucking name outside of Zombi Kampung Pisang. He's the goddamn Malaysian Quentin Tarantino and people can still say "Hurr Malaysia makes such bad films". Why does Malaysia have such bad movies? You need only look in the mirror.

Obligatory Gold Edit: A rant post in Malaysia actually getting gold? My my. Thank you for that.
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2018.06.10 11:52 -en- @AFP: #UPDATE North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives in Singapore for an unprecedented summit with Donald Trump, an attempt to address the last festering legacy of the Cold War https://t.co/bepxuJvawc

@AFP: #UPDATE North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrives in Singapore for an unprecedented summit with Donald Trump, an attempt to address the last festering legacy of the Cold War https://t.co/bepxuJvawc submitted by -en- to newsbotbot [link] [comments]


2018.06.10 11:02 autotldr North Korean leader Kim arrives in Singapore ahead of summit with U.S. President Donald Trump.

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 67%. (I'm a bot)
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un arrived in Singapore on Sunday for an unprecedented summit with U.S. President Donald Trump, an attempt to address the last festering legacy of the Cold War.
Bringing the Korean War to a formal end 65 years after hostilities ceased will also be on the table at the first-ever summit between a North Korean leader and a sitting U.S. president of its "Imperialist enemy."
The city-state's foreign minister, Vivian Balakrishnan, tweeted a picture of himself shaking hands with Kim at Changi Airport, and the North Korean leader was driven into the center in a stretch limousine, accompanied by a convoy of more than 20 vehicles.
Kim was due to meet Singaporean President Lee Hsien Loong later Sunday, the city-state's Foreign Ministry said, while Trump was flying from Canada on board Air Force One after leaving the G7 summit early.
"People call it a historic summit but ... it is important to understand that this summit was available to any U.S. president who wanted to do it and the point is no U.S. president wanted to do this, and for good reasons," said Christopher Hill, a former lead U.S. nuclear negotiator with North Korea.
Last year it carried out by far its most powerful nuclear test to date and launched missiles capable of reaching the U.S. mainland, sending tensions soaring to a level unseen in years as a newly-elected Trump traded threats of war and colorful personal insults with Kim, with Trump dubbed a "Dotard" and Kim "Little Rocket Man.".
Summary Source FAQ Feedback Top keywords: U.S.#1 North#2 Kim#3 Trump#4 summit#5
Post found in /worldnews, /AutoNewspaper and /TJTauto.
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
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2017.08.01 19:56 autotldr Any minister accused of improper conduct must clear his name publicly: PM Lee

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 32%. (I'm a bot)
SINGAPORE - Any minister accused of improper conduct must clear his name publicly and "Should not allow the allegations to fester and affect the reputation of the Government", Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said on Tuesday.
In a written parliamentary reply to Aljunied GRC Member of Parliament Chen Show Mao, PM Lee explained that if the allegation is serious, he would expect the minister to take court action for defamation, "Unless there are other special considerations".
PM Lee added: "He may also need to render account in Parliament, particularly if the matter concerns his discharge of public duties and is of public interest. These are not mutually exclusive options. In all cases, there must be public accounting."
Mr Chen had asked PM Lee about the circumstances in which a minister or political appointee should defend his reputation in his official capacity in the courts, or refrain from such court action and address allegations publicly, such as in Parliament.
In response, PM Lee noted that he had addressed this issue in his Ministerial Statement on July 3.
The statement was delivered in response to allegations by his siblings Dr Lee Wei Ling and Mr Lee Hsien Yang, who accused PM Lee of abusing his power in a bid to stop them from carrying out their late father's will to demolish their family home at 38 Oxley Road. In the statement, PM Lee said he would certainly sue for defamation in "Any other imaginable circumstance".
Summary Source FAQ Feedback Top keywords: Lee#1 court#2 public#3 Statement#4 allegation#5
Post found in /singapore.
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2017.07.11 00:23 disman2345_ Progressive Asian female activists tend to conflate themselves as individuals but judge Asian men and Asian countries problems as one giant group. As well as prioritize gender identity and sexual preference identity before racial identity, and tries to force their beliefs on Asian men.

PART 1: IMPORTANT PART
Who else gets a feeling that the faux female Asian activists aren’t being completely honest and genuine? Faux progressive Asian female feminists are trying to tell Asian American men what to think, believe, who they can’t date, and why they should continue to bend over and be oppress. The “Asian community” that these faux progressive Asian female feminists is a buzzword they use to silence the opposition. If they could, the first thing they would try to get rid of their Asian identify and would rather be some other identity, whether European American, African American, Latino American, etc. I learn that they would blatantly use “intersectionality” to push their female identity first and their Asian identity second. This is already a subconscious signal that they dislike being Asian so they would put more importance on their female identity. This means using words such as “misogyny” and “patriarchy” and “toxic Asian masculinity”.
The “Asian community” is made up of Asian males and Asian females. They support Asian females (at least the one who agrees with them), so they are forced to begrudgingly support Asian male. Or so you thought? Who would support you blatantly hate? I know I wouldn’t. So these faux Progressive Asian female feminists would twist the “Asian male” box (yes box, because liberals talk about groups as if they are boxes on a checklist) into the Asian male who they know who support them. They would always use LGBT Asian male as an excuse to shut Asian males down.
Faux Progressive Asian female activists keeps trying to gaslight in order to silence Asian males as well as Asian females who don’t agree 100% with their ideology.
https://www.yomyomf.com/the-different-type-of-racism-that-asian-men-endure-and-why-as-asian-women-we-shouldnt-ignore-it/
If you scroll down to Erin Chew comment, this is what she partially wrote
“Where this piece is good and covers a lot, it does omit gay and trans Asian men, who are always left out of this conversation. We focus too much on cishet East Asian men and forget that Asia is more than just “East Asia”. So let’s keep all this in mind if we are to call for more solidarity we need to be inclusive, not exclusive.”
The foundation for the Asian community consist of Asian females and Asian males (not Asian American community because Erin Chew is from Australia, so she’s Asian Australian). I find it very dishonest and distracting to try to solve LGBT problems in the Asian community before trying to solve the major problem that the majority of Asians have. How can you build a fifth floor when the ground level isn’t even built yet? Are Progressive Asian female activists lazy because they want to fix the easiest problem that pertains to the smallest population and claim success? Fixing shallow problems doesn’t contribute much to the Asian community, the underlying problem will still remain and continues to fester.
To add on to this, Erin Chew tries to conglomerate sub-regions of Asia into one giant mess. It would be easy to silence Asian men if you state that Asian misogyny exists because ISIS uses Yazidi women as sex slaves or eve teasing in India is so prevalent just because ISIS is fighting a war in Southwest Asia or that India is geographically South Asia. Somehow it is Korean men fault that they share the same geographic continent as Indian men. It is Vietnamese men fault that Saudi females aren’t allowed to go outside without being escorted by a male.
Progressive Asian female activists put Asian men into one giant collective group, while WMAF are excused as individuals and “don’t dare question her dating preferences”. Progressive Asian female activists see themselves as individuals and this is how they excuse how WMAF contribute to white supremacy and racism in Anglo countries, yet Asian men are one giant piss pot where they fling their angry rants at.
I find it incredulous how faux Progressive Asian female activists tries to stuff their ideology down Asian male mouth and find the resistance as aggression. Many faux Progressive Asian female activists put FEMALE as their identity first. They love to use words such as cis, trans, gay, etc. Heck, Ragingfuckalot uses the word “ableist” because her boyfriend is disabled, if she didn’t have have a disabled boyfriend, I question if she would even know the word “ableist”. Many of these kind of people who use their sexual dating preference as the first thing they identify with, that is why they keep referring to the enemy as cis-gendered Asian males, while their allies is trans-gendered Asian males or gay Asian males. Asian male like me, just identify as Asian male, we don’t identify with gender or sexual preference as our first priority. And by trying to force us to identify as cis or trans or gay, they are forcing their ideology down our mouth, yet when we are blamed for mansplaning when we talk about our positions and arguments.
SUMMARY:
Faux Progressive Asian female group regions in Asia with high patriarchy like Saudi Arabia and conflate it with regions such as China and Japan.
Faux Progressive Asian female see themselves as individuals while Asian males are one giant group to slander against.
Faux Progressive Asian females identify with their sexual preference first tries to force sexual or gender identify before racial identify down Asian men’s mouth.
Gender identity is more important than racial identify because they are fully committed to gender and not race.
PART TWO: NOT IMPORTANT, DON'T NEED TO READ IF YOU DON'T WANT TO READ
After focusing on the most important part, I decided to criticize a few snarky posters
Nemracbackwards and RagingFuckalot feeds off of each other bitterness and negativity and creates an unpleasant experience for the Asian community if they want to move forward. People get more brazen when they get positive feedback on what they say, in this case, Nemracbackwards and RagingFuckalot complement each other, which creates a more absurd position. They aren’t contributing, but instead reacting. Instead of trashing the article
https://www.yomyomf.com/the-different-type-of-racism-that-asian-men-endure-and-why-as-asian-women-we-shouldnt-ignore-it/
they should write their own articles instead and see who is willing to publish these articles in medium such as YOMYOMF and NextShark. Here are some examples of what they wrote:
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk0d1fh/
nemracbackwards for example, in this post, just said “Nope” to Natalie Ng. There isn’t any explanation to why she said nope. Is Natalie Ng a yes or no question. Nemracbackwards dismisses a person just because her name is Natalie Ng. It is one thing to at least state, “I don’t take her word seriously because she has a past of slandering the arguments I stand up for”. Just saying one word answers is something a little child says because their vocabulary is limited. This remind me of people in high school who said “No, just no” without stating any reason. Am I supposed to take their word without any explanation whatsoever. Are they capable of explaining the meaning behind the nope.
“Fuck you, fuck this, garbage writing” signifies someone with low pain threshold and weak willpower. If reading an article you disagree with is that unpleasant, then you shouldn’t be reading it in the first place.
Nemracbackwards attempts to exaggerate the post with “proceeds to shit on Constance Wu for her dating choices”. Doesn’t understand that image of something as a symbol is important. Not everyone will know what Constance Wu says or her positions are, because humans have short attention spans, but the image of Constance Wu with her boyfriend means so much more than what she says.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk1hceo/
Nemrackbacwards says “brain dead and uneducated minions. Yeah I said it”. This is the type of person who wants Asian solidarity, by cursing out a bunch of people.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk18c43/
Misogyny is the buzzword for something you disagree with, and it happens to be from someone you assume is male.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk1atg1/
I don’t see the point of linking a gif if you can’t explain it in words. This reminds me of people who are lazy but wants to get the last word in, but can’t form their arguments so they just filibuster it with useless shit.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk1jw2s/
More absurd gif, humor is lost with me, not a good argument against copy and paste statistics.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk1muyv/
Singapore isn’t in East Asia, it’s in Southeast Asia, next to Malaysia, a Southeast Asian country.
https://www.reddit.com/asiantwoX/comments/6mbgym/the_different_type_of_racism_that_asian_men/dk0hdow/
I enjoy how RagingFuckalot uses personal attacks on Natalie Ng and plays victims, and tries to make Natalie Ng look like an indifferent uncaring individual who doesn’t care about checkboxes that liberals are obsessed about. Somehow it’s Natalie fault some random poster on EasternRisingSun is opposing RagingFuckalot. YOMYOMF is a medium anyone can make an account and post because it is an open space (except for Aznchick4WhiteGod). So YOMYOMF is suppose to take down Natalie Ng article because you don’t agree with it. So far, Natalie Ng got 31 comments, and a number of them are reactions to Erin Chew and not about what Natalie Ng wrote.
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Little Mix - Ring The Alarm / Salute Live in Singapore 23/05/16 The Addams Family Commercial Dester Singapore Gold Cup 2016 Contenders (Blue Swede) THE ADDAMS FAMILY in Singapore ! (Interview by TheWickeRmoss) # 439 [dica] - PC Ostentação dos Sonhos de R$50.000? - YouTube The Addams Family - Fester's Transformation Carrie Hope Fletcher, Sam Womack & Les Dennis sing When ... The Addams Family - Fester's Manifesto Little Mix, Dublin - Jump On It / Crazy In Love / Fester Skank / Where Are Ü Now / Ring The Alarm

WWII Wounds In Asia Continue To Fester

  1. Little Mix - Ring The Alarm / Salute Live in Singapore 23/05/16
  2. The Addams Family Commercial
  3. Dester Singapore Gold Cup 2016 Contenders (Blue Swede)
  4. THE ADDAMS FAMILY in Singapore ! (Interview by TheWickeRmoss)
  5. # 439 [dica] - PC Ostentação dos Sonhos de R$50.000? - YouTube
  6. The Addams Family - Fester's Transformation
  7. Carrie Hope Fletcher, Sam Womack & Les Dennis sing When ...
  8. The Addams Family - Fester's Manifesto
  9. Little Mix, Dublin - Jump On It / Crazy In Love / Fester Skank / Where Are Ü Now / Ring The Alarm

Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Uncle Fester, Grandma and Lurch of THE ADDAMS FAMILY invades Singapore for The Addams Family International Musical Tour. The musical play runs from 09-28th ... A sneak peek at the hit musical's new commercial. Julia Roberts Acts Out Her Film Career w/ James Corden - Duration: 9:46. The Late Late Show with James Corden Recommended for you 50+ videos Play all Mix - Little Mix, Dublin - Jump On It / Crazy In Love / Fester Skank / Where Are Ü Now / Ring The Alarm YouTube Little Mix - Get Weird Tour Europe - Madrid (Spain) - Duration ... Here's the full version of 'When You're An Addams' performed by the cast of The Addams Family at the Press Launch day at their rehearsal studios in London - ... Dester Singapore Gold Cup 2016 (Bahana) - Duration: 2:49. Singapore Turf Club 43,970 views. 2:49. Selby V O'Sullivan FINAL Fr23 2014 World Champ [HD1080p] - Duration: 23:54. A scene from 'The Addams Family - A New Musical Comedy,' Andrew Lippa's interpretation of Charles Addams' characters. Includes the song 'Fester's Manifesto.' Fester is played by C. Conrad Cady ... Fanpage: https://www.facebook.com/FasterBenchmarker Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/fasterbenchmarker The making of Fester...and Cousin It. FCT The Addams Family promo #2. - Duration: 3:14. Fremont Community Theatre 1,772 views. 3:14. Little Mix Performing Salute Live in Singapore. Little Mix - Jump On It, Crazy In Love, Fester Skank, Where Are Ü Now, Ring The Alarm Lyrics - Duration: 4:45. lyrics wonder 177,809 views